Paying for Family Planning

 This report discusses the challenges and costs involved in meeting the future needs for family planning in developing countries.  Estimates of current expenditures for family planning go as high as $4.5 billion.  According to a UNFPA report, developing country governments contribute 75% of the payments for family planning, with donor agencies contributing 15%, and users paying for 10%.  Although current expenditures cover the needs of about 315 million couples of reproductive age in developing countries, this number of couples accounts for only 44% of all married women of reproductive age.  Meeting all current contraceptive needs would require an additional $1 to $1.4 billion.  By the year 2000, as many as 600 million couples could require family planning, costing as much as $11 billion a year.  While the brunt of the responsibility for covering these costs will remain in the hand of governments and donor agencies (governments spend only 0.4% of their total budget on family planning and only 1% of all development assistance goes towards family planning), a wide array of approaches can be utilized to help meet costs.  The report provides detailed discussions on the following approaches:  1) retail sales and fee-for-services providers, which involves an expanded role for the commercial sector and an increased emphasis on marketing; 2) 3rd-party coverage, which means paying for family planning service through social security institutions, insurance plans, etc.; 3) public-private collaboration (social marketing, employment-based services, etc.); 4) cost recovery, such as instituting fees in public and private nonprofit family planning clinics; and 5) improvements in efficiency.

Year: 
1991
Organization: 
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Center for Communication Programs,Population Information Program
Languages: 
English