Toolkits by Country

Swaziland

  • Archived Toolkit
    Swaziland is the first country in the world to support an accelerated, nation-wide male circumcision (MC) plan. The Accelerated Saturation Initiative (ASI) is known in country as Soka Uncobe, translating to circumcise is to conquer. Beginning in 2010, the Ministry of Health began planning the program following approval from Cabinet. The campaign was planned as a short, intense campaign with an end date of September 2011. With resources available, the campaign was extended through March 2012. Led by the Ministry of Health with support from the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief...
  • Archived Toolkit
    Welcome to the Swaziland HIV Prevention eToolkit. This collection of materials has been compiled by the National HIV & AIDS Information and Training Centre (Info Centre).  The resources in this eToolkit cover a broad range of topics pertaining to HIV and AIDS prevention. The material are in the form of research papers, periodicals, books, training materials (toolkits and manuals), and awareness raising products (posters, booklets, leaflets, presentations), that creatively and factually share current and dynamic knowledge and skills relating to HIV and AIDS, TB, and other related...

Tanzania

  • Toolkit
    The Tanzania Capacity and Communication Project (TCCP) was a six-year project (2010-2016) funded by USAID. TCCP’s areas of focus include HIV prevention, reproductive health, maternal and child health, and malaria. At its outset, TCCP envisioned a Tanzania that takes charge of its own health, creating healthy households where individual- and system-level change lead to healthier families and communities. Throughout the last five and a half years, TCCP has implemented national social and behavior change communication (SBCC) while working diligently to support and grow a network of...

Uganda

  • Archived Toolkit
    HIV testing and counseling is central to Uganda’s HIV Control Programme and services have become increasingly available since 1990. Yet, only 11 - 13% had ever tested for HIV in 2004, according to the 2004/5 Sero-behavioural Survey, and even fewer knew the HIV status of their sexual partners. According to the Modes of Transmission Analysis Report, 2009, 65% of new HIV infections in Uganda occur among married couples; which means that being married puts people at a higher risk of HIV infection than those who never married. Based on this evidence, the MoH, launched the national “Go...
  • Archived Toolkit
    Over the last ten years, the fertility rate in Uganda has remained persistently high with an average of 6.7 births per woman.  According to the Uganda Demographic Health Survey 2006, 41% of the women in Uganda would like to delay or stop having children but are not using modern family planning, and therefore, have an unmet need. The main reasons for non-use, according to that survey, were fear of health problems or side effects, and husband's disapproval. Working with the Ministry of Health with funding from the United States Agency of International Development, the Health...
  • Archived Toolkit
    Between 2007 and 2012, the USAID-funded Health Communication Partnership (HCP) Project developed and implemented communication strategies and tools and strengthened capacity in social and behavior change communication (SBCC) with the Ugandan government, international organizations, and local nongovernmental organizations. HCP was managed by The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP). This project extended and expanded communication activities initiated between 2004 and 2007 under a previous USAID award to HCP.  In order to work towards the shared goals of...
  • Archived Toolkit
    Communication for Development Foundation Uganda (CDFU) established the National Health Hotline with technical support from the Health Communication Partnership and financial support from the United States Agency for International Development, to improve access to information and counseling about issues that have few other services on the ground in Uganda.   Two such issues in Uganda are alcohol abuse and gender based violence.  Over the years, the Health Hotline has expanded to provide a reliable, anonymous and non-judgmental service for callers seeking...
  • Archived Toolkit
    In Uganda, over 150,000 children (under 15 years) currently have HIV, but only about 28% are getting the treatment that they need.  Since life-saving treatment is available, these children should be given the chance to live the longer, healthier lives that ART enables. From 2006 to 2009, the Health Communication Partnership and the Joint Clinical Research Centre worked with the Ministry of Health and partners to develop the TREAT for Life campaign in mulitple phases including caretakers of children and adolescents at risk of HIV as well as HIV positive adolescents.  ...
  • Archived Toolkit
    Over 1.2 million people are living with HIV in Uganda. With over 100,000 new infections every year, Uganda will soon be unable to enroll all those who require treatment on ARVs. Fortunately, there are simple evidence-based practices that can keep people living with HIV (PLHIV) healthy for longer and delay the need for ARVs. The National Positive Living Communication Campaign launched in December, 2010, is intended to motivate PLHIV to adopt these life-prolonging practices. The campaign utilizes a multi-channel approach to reach out to PLHIV,...
  • Archived Toolkit
    Village Health Teams (VHTs) were established by the Uganda Ministry of Health (MoH) to: empower communities to take part in the decisions that affect their health; mobilize communities for health programs; and strengthen the delivery of health services at the household level. Village Health Teams are made up of volunteers who are selected by their communities to provide accurate health information and link community members with available health services. After selection, VHTs receive basic training in a cross section of key health issues common in Uganda. The biggest...