Burkina Faso

  • Blog post
    Young mothers with their children in Burkina Faso.

    Young mothers with their children in Burkina Faso. Photo: Célestin Compaore.

    In middle- and low-income countries, about 90% of births to adolescents occur within marriage or a union. Many of these young women are under substantial pressure from in-laws and other gatekeepers to begin childbearing immediately and to space their births closely, and service providers often reinforce these assumptions—all resulting in poorer health outcomes and less autonomy for young women. For years, programmatic and policy efforts have focused on preventing early and child marriage, but have paid little attention to adolescents after they marry or have children.

  • Blog post

    This post originally appeared on The Huffington Post and on IntraHealth's blog, VITAL.

    "Being a youth ambassador has changed my life."

    "Being a youth ambassador has changed my life," Abou Diallo says. "I’ve become more and more the person I dream of being. Young people and adults come to me now for information on reproductive health and family planning." Photo courtesy of Abou Diallo.

    Young leaders have the power to reach their peers and communities in ways most government officials can’t.

    Abou Diallo was on vacation with his family when his girlfriend showed up to see him, agitated and worried. She hadn’t had her period for two months, she told him. A pregnancy test confirmed their fears.

  • Blog post

    This piece, including a slideshow of youth ambassadors, was originally published on IntraHealth International's blog, VITAL.

    Romaric Ouitona, president of Youth Ambassadors in Benin, speaks to his peers at a youth center that offers family planning services and education in Dangbo, Benin.

    Romaric Ouitona, president of Youth Ambassadors in Benin, speaks to his peers at a youth center that offers family planning services and education in Dangbo, Benin. Photo by Trevor Snapp for IntraHealth International.

    They’re informed, determined, and looking ahead for the good of their peers—and their countries.

    They want to help girls stay in school. To take control of their own futures. To make sure other young people don’t make the same mistakes or have to live the same nightmares they did.

  • Blog post
    Un kiosque de planification familiale au salon de la santé au Burkina Faso.

    Un kiosque de planification familiale au salon de la santé au Burkina Faso. © 2011 Centre pour les programmes de communication, avec la permission de Photoshare

    Quand j'étais en formation pour devenir sage-femme, une hôtesse de l'air, sans argent et dans un état critique, se présentait à la maternité de l'hôpital Yalgado Ouédraogo de Ouagadougou, après avoir eu recours à un avortement raté. Mes collègues et moi avons cotisé de l'argent afin de lui procurer ses médicaments essentiels, mais malheureusement elle a succombé à ses saignements (hémorragie)—malgré le fait que nous lui avons administré ses médicaments.

  • Blog post
    A family planning booth at a health fair in Burkina Faso.

    A family planning booth at a health fair in Burkina Faso. © 2011 Center for Communication Programs, Courtesy of Photoshare

    When I was in training to become a midwife, a flight attendant, with no money and in critical condition, arrived at the maternity ward of Yalgado Ouédraogo hospital in Ouagadougou after getting a botched abortion. My colleagues and I put money together to buy her essential medicines, but she eventually died—even after we administered the medicines. We were shocked. And I thought, we must do something to improve women’s reproductive health. When I think that this woman could have been saved if she’d had access to contraception earlier, I’m reminded of my reason for becoming a midwife—to save human beings.

  • Blog post

    This post was originally published by Pathfinder International.

    As a youth advocate, Zeynabou works to ensure other young women and girls in Burkina Faso do not have to endure the pain and hardships her sister Farida did.

    As a youth advocate, Zeynabou works to ensure other young women and girls in Burkina Faso do not have to endure the pain and hardships her sister Farida did.

    I counted more than 20 pregnancies—all unplanned.

    When I was in secondary school, I went from class to class and counted all the teenage girls who were pregnant. I wanted to hear about their experiences.

    I stood in front of these girls, listening to their stories. One after another, they said, "I did not know about contraception." 

  • West Africa

    West African Health Organization Knowledge Management and Information Technology Assessment Findings

  • Blog post
    A young Burkinabe girl cares for her sick little brother in Koudougou, Burkina Faso.

    A young Burkinabe girl cares for her sick little brother in Koudougou, Burkina Faso. © 2012 Mohamad Syar/CCP, Courtesy of Photoshare

    The Family Planning Youth Ambassador Program in Burkina Faso focuses on raising awareness about family planning and reproductive health services among our country’s youth. We’ve engaged a lot of young people on the topic, but, as this testimonial from a young woman named Chantal shows, we were unintentionally leaving out many young people, namely married adolescents and out-of-school youth.

  • Blog post

    The Evidence to Action Project (E2A) is pleased to announce the publication of four technical briefs summarizing its assessment of postabortion care (PAC) services in four West African countries. The assessments, which emphasize the family planning component of PAC services, follow the concerted effort of Francophone West African countries to strengthen PAC services at point of treatment.

    E2A conducted the assessments in Burkina Faso, Guinea, Senegal, and Togo. All of these countries participated in a regional conference in 2008, where country teams developed action plans for strengthening PAC that would apply the Virtual Fostering Change methodology for strengthened services and scale-up. The action plans aimed to improve certain aspects of PAC service delivery, such as:

    • Reorganization of PAC services
    • Trainings 
    • Supply chain management for family planning commodities and manual vacuum aspiration kits
    • Health information systems
    • Financing
    • Leadership, governance and management
    • Community mobilization for PAC