Uganda

  • Blog post
    Un dirigeant confessionnel démontrant son soutien à la planification familiale lors de l'ICFP 2018.

    Un dirigeant confessionnel démontrant son soutien à la planification familiale lors de l'ICFP 2018. Photo: Kathy Erb

    «Si vos parents avaient eu recours à la planification familiale, vous ne seriez pas ici», a déclaré un responsable gouvernemental à Mme Séraphine Lugwarna Nzigire lorsqu'elle est allée promouvoir les services de planification familiale afin de réduire le taux élevé de décès maternels dans son district en République démocratique du Congo (RDC). Elle n'a pas été dissuadée. Elle lui a dit qu'elle ne partirait pas avant d'avoir expliqué ce qui se passait dans sa communauté pour qu'il comprenne le besoin. Mme Nzigire est membre du Bureau diocésain des œuvres médicales (BDOM), une organisation catholique qui place le bien-être de la population au centre de ses travaux, un trait essentiel pour le succès de la promotion en faveur de la planification familiale de BDOM.

  • Blog post
    A faith leader demonstrating his support for family planning at ICFP 2018.

    A faith leader demonstrating his support for family planning at ICFP 2018. Photo: Kathy Erb

    “If your parents used family planning you would not be here,” a government official said to Mrs. Séraphine Lugwarna Nzigire when she went to advocate for family planning services to reduce the high rate of maternal deaths in her district in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). She was not deterred. She told him she was not leaving until she explained what was happening in her community so he would understand the need. Mrs. Nzigire is with Bureau Diocesain des Oeuvres Medicale (BDOM), a Catholic organization that puts the wellbeing of the people at the center of its work, a trait that has been crucial to BDOM’s family planning advocacy success.

  • Blog post
    Tumusiime share fair blog photo

    The East Africa Regional Share Fair attracted participants from many sectors.

    In his book Post-Capitalist Society, prominent management thinker and writer Peter F. Drucker notes, “Knowledge has become the key economic resource and the dominant—and perhaps even the only—source of competitive advantage.”

    How to make this a reality for East Africa informed most of the discussions at the Regional Share Fair conducted in Uganda in June 2018. The objective of the Share Fair was to collaboratively learn how to apply knowledge management (KM) tools, techniques, and approaches in the health sector.

  • Blog post
    The Art of Photography is the second in K4Health/IYAFP's storytelling webinar series.

    The Art of Photography is the second in K4Health/IYAFP's storytelling webinar series. Photo: UYAHF

    The Knowledge for Health (K4Health) team has conducted storytelling workshops around the world over the past few years, from South Africa to the Philippines. We’ve been particularly energized by the opportunities we’ve had to help strengthen the capacity of grassroots youth-led organizations to use storytelling to reach their audiences and communicate about their work and the issues that matter to them. To share some of our essential tips and tools with a broader audience, particularly with young sexual and reproductive health professionals working in all corners of the world, K4Health is currently partnering with the International Youth Alliance for Family Planning (IYAFP) to jointly offer a digital storytelling webinar series.

  • Blog post
    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair.

    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    The alarm rings at exactly 6:30am on 20 June 2018. It seems like I have only just blinked. A brand new day ushers in the beginning of the EAC Regional Share Fair. I yawn, then I stretch. Then I snooze for a couple more minutes before I get ready. The previous day’s trip to Uganda was quite exhausting. It is unfortunate we still do not have a direct flight to Entebbe from Dar es Salaam. (Private jet from USAID next time?)

  • Blog post
    EAC Share Fair June 2018

    The EAC Regional Share Fair will be held June 20-22 in Entebbe, Uganda. (Click to enlarge.)

    The East African Community (EAC), like most other low- and middle-income regions, is grappling with a myriad of disease burdens ranging from common infections, nutritional challenges, and maternal mortality to non-communicable diseases to epidemics. Article 118 of the Treaty for the Establishment of the EAC calls for stronger regional cooperation on health among the partner states. Realization of this mandate requires effective management of the health sector knowledge resources.

    The dynamic nature of the health sector presents a challenge: synthesis and sharing of knowledge among stakeholders and EAC partner states. Barriers include difficulties accessing information resources from both local and international sources and limited knowledge of and access to knowledge management tools and strategies.

  • Faster to Zero: EMTCT in South Africa and Uganda

    Uganda mTrac

    The Ntungamo District Biostatistician explains the mTrac system. Facility staff send data for key indicators by toll free SMS to the district office, where they review the data to manage drug stock distribution and for epidemiological surveillance. Credit: Cassandra Mickish Gross

     

    Background

    ​​Despite significant improvements in reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, keeping women in care throughout the full recommended cascade of services remains a challenge. In addition, women living with HIV may not feel comfortable asking certain questions of their health provider or may not have access to a provider when they need information.

    When integrated into national health and information systems, digital health tools can help health care workers to provide effective counseling and support patients throughout their care, as well as engage and inform clients and their families in their care. In South Africa, the national MomConnect initiative has registered more than 1.7 million pregnant women to receive health messages on their mobile phones throughout their pregnancy and the first year of their child’s life. In Uganda, the national FamilyConnect program sends timely and relevant messages to pregnant women, mothers, and other household members with reminders to return to the health facility for recommended services.

  • Blog post
    Women should be able to find and use a contraceptive method of their choice, and self-injection with DMPA may be an appealing option for those who want to manage their own reproductive health.

    Women should be able to find and use a contraceptive method of their choice, and self-injection with DMPA may be an appealing option for those who want to manage their own reproductive health. Photo: PATH/Will Boase

    Recent evidence on self-injection of a new injectable contraceptive called subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC) is providing one possible answer to an age-old question in family planning: How do we address barriers that make it difficult for women to keep using contraception consistently?

    According to three recent studies, women who self-inject with DMPA-SC in their own homes or communities may continue using injectable contraception longer than those who receive injections from providers. In many Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) countries, injectable contraception is already popular, but often requires women to return to clinics every three months for injections. This can pose a significant barrier to consistent contraceptive use, especially for women who live in rural and remote areas. These new findings on self-injection should be very good news for women who like injectable contraception—if the global FP field has the courage to put this option for pregnancy prevention directly in women’s hands.

  • Resource

    In July 2017, the Ugandan National Drug Authority approved a plan that will allow licensed and accredited private drug shops to stock and administer injectable contraception beginning in 20 districts. This policy change makes Uganda the first country in Africa to support drug shops’ provision of the most popular family planning method on the continent. This success did not come overnight but was the result of years of policy advocacy which began with stakeholder engagement and building the evidence base to support this practice.

  • Blog post
    PHAU family planning concert in Hoima

    PHAU's concert, Famile Pulaningi Mu Ndongo, attracted thousands of people to learn about family planning while having a great time.

    Friday, November 24, 2017 got the people of Hoima, Uganda merrymaking and dancing! They turned up in the thousands for a family planning concert organized by Public Health Ambassadors Uganda (PHAU). The concert, dubbed Famile Pulaningi Mu Ndongo (a Luganda phrase for the combination of edu-tainment with family planning information and services), was held at the Hoima Booma grounds, where top local artists, comedians, and actors treated the revelers to a night filled with themed musical performances, skits, comedy, and much more.

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