Tanzania

  • Blog post
    Tuungane Tanzania Cheryl Margoluis

    The Tuungane project in western Tanzania was a perfect match for the Evidence Project’s research because the social and environmental challenges facing local communities along the forested shores of Lake Tanganyika provide a good case study for examining resilience. Photo: © Cheryl Margoluis, Pathfinder International.

    The development community’s interest in enhancing the resilience of individuals, households, and communities in lower- and middle-income countries so they can better contend with environmental and human-made shocks and stress is growing. While good health at the population and individual level, and the ability to space and plan births, are thought to contribute to resilience, existing resilience-building frameworks have largely ignored the role of population dynamics. The potential contributions of family planning to resilience have remained unknown—until now. Newly published research on a project in western Tanzania provides evidence that family planning is positively associated with multiple components of resilience.

  • Resource

    Get actionable steps to capture important knowledge gained from your work and effectively share that knowledge with others in the webinar presentation, “We’re doing all this good work: What are we learning and how do we share it?” from our Knowledge Management in Practice series.

  • Blog post
    The Share Fair exemplified the EAC's readiness to use knowledge management to ensure better integration and improved health outcomes for all of its citizens.

    The Share Fair exemplified the EAC's readiness to use knowledge management to ensure better integration and improved health outcomes for all of its citizens. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    If you have been engaged in global health work, you should know by now that knowledge management (KM) approaches have taken a central place in program implementation to improve health outcomes. While the practices are not new (in fact, they date back to old times, such as the Industrial Age, when knowledge was focused on machinery and human physical energy), the field has been growing. Knowledge once meant only accessing data and info, then developed into understanding gained from experience, analysis, and sharing. Now, knowledge management is more human centered and focused on around generating, capturing, sharing, and applying learning in order to achieve both customer satisfaction and innovation.

  • Blog post
    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair.

    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    The alarm rings at exactly 6:30am on 20 June 2018. It seems like I have only just blinked. A brand new day ushers in the beginning of the EAC Regional Share Fair. I yawn, then I stretch. Then I snooze for a couple more minutes before I get ready. The previous day’s trip to Uganda was quite exhausting. It is unfortunate we still do not have a direct flight to Entebbe from Dar es Salaam. (Private jet from USAID next time?)

  • Blog post
    PATH's Dawn Seymour discusses scenarios that implementers may face in transitioning from paper to digital records.

    PATH's Dawn Seymour discusses scenarios that implementers may face in transitioning from paper to digital records. Photo: Jarret Cassaniti

    During the 2017 Global Digital Health Forum session on Injecting Digital Technology into Old-School Immunization Systems, Dawn Seymour from PATH discussed the value of electronic immunization registries. Despite the benefits of such registries, including more accurate data, she and her colleagues Sang Dao Dinh and Hieu Tran explained some challenges when transitioning from legacy, paper-based systems in Zambia, Tanzania, and Vietnam to digital versions.

  • Resource

    Esta guía como una herramienta de referencia para cualquier persona que trabaje en la salud pública o el desarrollo internacional y que desee reunir a un grupo de personas para analizar ideas, afrontar desafíos y compartir las mejores prácticas. Los usuarios pueden utilizar esta guía como referencia para determinar qué es lo más relevante para sus necesidades específicas.

    In English

  • Blog post
    Dr. Blandina Mmbaga is the Director of Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute in Tanzania and a contributor to The East African Health Research Journal.

    Dr. Blandina Mmbaga is the Director of Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute in Tanzania and a contributor to The East African Health Research Journal.

    East Africans face distinct and often dire health threats. There is a great need for regionally-driven public health research on these and other topics. East African scholars seeking to publish their findings in international journals face challenges, however, such as limited funding opportunities or English-language skills.

    To address these challenges, the East African Health Research Commission (EAHRC), with support from USAID Kenya and East Africa and the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project, founded The East African Health Research Journal, a no-fee, open-access, peer-reviewed publication that aims to serve as a much-needed, African-led platform for untapped perspectives on regional health issues, as well as a launch pad for young and aspiring East African scholars.

  • Resource

    A Share Fair is a participatory event where professionals engage in collaborative conversations about experiences and expertise relating to best work practices. To systematically assess how such events influence knowledge sharing and organizational learning capacities, K4Health studied the effectiveness of a Knowledge Management Share Fair held in Arusha, Tanzania in April 2016, which gathered over 100 experts working in health and development at the country and regional levels.

  • Blog post
    Young mothers with their children in Burkina Faso.

    Young mothers with their children in Burkina Faso. Photo: Célestin Compaore.

    In middle- and low-income countries, about 90% of births to adolescents occur within marriage or a union. Many of these young women are under substantial pressure from in-laws and other gatekeepers to begin childbearing immediately and to space their births closely, and service providers often reinforce these assumptions—all resulting in poorer health outcomes and less autonomy for young women. For years, programmatic and policy efforts have focused on preventing early and child marriage, but have paid little attention to adolescents after they marry or have children.

  • Blog post

    At the recent Family Planning Summit for Safer, Healthier and Empowered Futures in London in July, representatives from country governments, donors, and civil society organizations reconvened, as many had five years earlier, to make bold commitments in support of reaching 120 million women with contraception by 2020. To achieve these commitments, governments and partners within a country must have a shared vision and must coordinate financing and implementation of aligned and complementary activities. Costed Implementation Plans (CIPs) are one way that countries have articulated and guided the who, what, when, and how much will it cost of achieving their FP2020 commitments. As we pause to reflect on the outcomes of our collective efforts over the past five years, I think it is equally important to reflect on the processes we have employed to achieve those outcomes, including how we implement CIPs.

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