Mali

  • Blog post
    Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé

    Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé, president of Muso Yiriwa Ton. Photo: David J. Olson

    The first five times the sales manager of Keneya Jemu Kan came looking for Madame Togo Kadiatou Mallé to talk about her women’s association selling condoms and other health products, she ran away and hid, so terrified was she of the prospect of having to work with condoms.

    But the sales manager’s persistence paid off. Eventually, they talked, and Madame Togo has become such an enthusiastic condom promoter, she is known as Mama Condom. She laughs about her fear of condoms.

  • Blog post
    The Reproductive Health and Family Planning Youth Ambassadors are a group of dedicated and engaged youth advocates who educate, counsel, and motivate our peers to adopt healthy sexual behaviors.

    The Reproductive Health and Family Planning Youth Ambassadors are a group of dedicated and engaged youth advocates who educate, counsel, and motivate our peers to adopt healthy sexual behaviors. Photo by Moctar Diallo courtesy of IntraHealth International.

    In Mali, young girls face the prospect of unwanted or adolescent pregnancies that can lead to unsafe abortions and other health risks. The most recent Demographic Health Survey indicated that early pregnancy increases the risk of death among adolescents. Further, pregnancy considerably reduces a young woman’s chances of continuing her studies and puts her at risk of sexually transmitted infections such as HIV/AIDS. In fact, young women are three times as likely as young men to become infected with HIV.

  • West African Health Organization KM Assessment

    Background

    Although each country faces unique challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, within a geographic region, governments, civil society organizations, and donors can benefit from learning from the experiences of their counterparts in other countries. K4Health has partnered with two regional bodies to improve health in West Africa through strengthened collaboration, coordination, and knowledge management (KM).

  • Blog post

    This blog post originally appeared January 6, 2015 on The Pump, JSI's blog promoting and improving health. 

    In order to achieve FP2020’s goals and ensuring that people have access to a broad range of contraceptives, it is essential that the Standard Days Method® (SDM) be included as part of the family planning (FP) modern method mix in health facilities and community-based family planning (CBFP) programs. On December 9, 2014, Advancing Partners & Communities (APC) launched its series of CBFP related technical consultations. This consultation focused on raising awareness of SDM as part of the method mix. Close to 50 people representing over 20 different organizations, including representatives from USAID as well as country representatives of programs in India, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda and Uganda, convened to discuss the integration of SDM into CBFP programs.

  • Blog post
    A young girl uses a cell phone at a market in Ghana. © 2006 Joitske Hulsebosch, Courtesy of Photoshare.

    A young girl uses a cell phone at a market in Ghana. © 2006 Joitske Hulsebosch, Courtesy of Photoshare.

    People often assume that, as a woman under 30, I must be a technology expert—based on no other credential than my age. While I may tire of explaining what an app is or how to tweet, the truth is that young people are in fact the largest consumers of new technology. In the last five years, the number of mobile phone subscribers worldwide has doubled to almost six billion, of which nearly a third are under the age of 30. Growth in mobile phone use has been particularly high in low- and middle-income countries, where an estimated 80 percent of future subscribers—including millions of technologically-savvy youth—reside.

    This growing population presents both opportunities and challenges for development, and underscores the need for greater investment in youth health. Given the high penetration of mobile phone use among young people, targeting them with mobile health (mHealth) interventions seems like a “no-brainer.” Yet, it has taken some time for the global health and development community to realize that young people represent interested consumers and early adopters of mHealth tools. To date, there are still only a limited number of programs that directly target youth. However, at this year’s Global mHealth Forum at the mHealth Summit, youth were front and center.

  • Blog post
    A sign advertises mobile phone sales in Malawi. © 2008 Josh Nesbit, Courtesy of Photoshare

    © 2008 Josh Nesbit, Courtesy of Photoshare.

    What does local ownership of an electronic health (eHealth) or mobile health (mHealth) service look like?  Depending on who you ask, you could probably get a thousand different answers. As a member of the mHealth Working Group Advisory Board and one of the organizers of the inaugural Global mHealth Forum, I hoped we could foster meaningful discussion about this very topic—and I think we succeeded.

    All of us working in eHealth and mHealth in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) understand that it is crucial to foster a sense of local ownership in order for a digital health solution to become sustainable. And yet, it can be difficult to reach agreement on what “local ownership” means. To one person, it could mean that you presented your mHealth concept to a group of stakeholders in-country and they signed off. To someone else, it could refer to an idea that was born in-country and realized with external project resources. Or it could refer to a scenario where an entire service was developed, implemented, and funded with local resources—both human and financial. I went to the Forum hoping to hear fewer examples of the former and more of the latter.