Madagascar

  • Blog post
    Honorina

    “At first I was afraid to have something inside of my uterus, but now my period is regular again and I feel healthier.” – satisfied IUS client, Honorina (age 27). (c) PSI/Shayla Durrett

    This piece was originally published on PSI's blog, Impact.

    As a young woman in Madagascar studying to become a seamstress, Honorina didn’t want the stress of worrying about unintended pregnancy. She was already well aware of the complex choices women face to manage their reproductive health; many methods she had used before didn’t align with her personal preferences for family planning. She had tried the traditional rhythm method but worried that it didn’t provide enough protection. She had tried injectables but found it too inconvenient to visit the clinic every three months for another dose. Then, looking for effectiveness and convenience, Honorina tried the implant, but she found it difficult to manage the irregular spotting she experienced. None of these methods quite aligned with her needs, preferences, and lifestyle.

  • Blog post

    This piece was originally published by the Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP).

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child.

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child. (Photo courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCSP.)

    Morondava, Madagascar—At home and in active labor with her third child, 24-year-old Intocelliah was scared. Her previous births had progressed quickly and naturally, but—after a long day of discomfort—this labor seemed stalled.

    In the neighborhood of Sanfily, where she lives, most women give birth at home with the help of family or a traditional birth attendant. But after hours and little progress, Intocelliah feared complications and danger for both her and her baby, and asked to go to the hospital.

  • Blog post
    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia.

    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Photo by Daniel Adero.

    This piece originally appeared on CCP's blog.

    The concept is simpler than the name suggests: To improve communities and the livelihoods of their people.

    The approach is called Population, Health and Environment, PHE for short. PHE programs are specifically designed to promote modern family planning, encourage environmental conservation and improve health outcomes by creating a package of interventions such as pairing education about dwindling fisheries with education around contraception and malaria prevention.

  • Resource

    In this PowerPoint, Nantenaina Andriamalala presents the Madagascar PHE Network’s successful implementation of Population, Health, and Environment activities. To see PHE in action in other parts of the world, view our webinar: PHE Voices: Stories and Lessons Learned from Four Diverse Settings.

     

  • Blog post
    PHE Voices: Stories and Lessons Learned from Four Diverse Settings

    Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) experts from The Philippines, Madagascar, Ethiopia, and the Lake Victoria Basin share stories from the field. Photo credit: Meagan Harrison, courtesy of Photoshare.

    The Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) approach addresses the relationship between human health and environmental health in order to improve primary health care services, conserving biodiversity and natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. When development issues are addressed together, communities thrive.

  • Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) Voices

    Ethiopia village elder

    Shek Kasim Kurke, a village elder and religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia, poses for a picture.

     

    Background

    Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) is a development approach that focuses on the relationship between human health and environmental health. Integrated PHE programs improve primary health care services, particularly family planning and reproductive health, while also helping communities conserve biodiversity, manage natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. Some countries--such as Ethiopia, Madagascar, and the Philippines--have done extensive work in PHE policy and programming, and have powerful stories to tell. Capturing and sharing these stories provides a strong advocacy tool for the PHE approach and complements research and evaluation data.

  • Blog post
    Projet Jeune Leader recruits dynamic young adults to work full-time as sexuality educators, counselors, and mentors to public middle school students in Madagascar's Haute Matsiatra region.

    Projet Jeune Leader recruits dynamic young adults to work full-time as sexuality educators, counselors, and mentors to public middle school students in Madagascar's Haute Matsiatra region. Photo: Projet Jeune Leader

    We need innovation, not renovation, when it comes to providing youth with comprehensive sexuality education.

    The investments and commitments that governments, multilateral organizations, foundations, and other global health agencies have made during the past decade to provide adolescents and young people with comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) are testaments to its value. And yet, there is comparatively little to show for this invigorated effort.

    We have shown, however, that we already know a substantial impeding factor.

  • Blog post

    This piece was originally published by USAID's Maternal and Child Survival Program.

    Sixteen-year-old Aisha Lausali (right) after delivering her first child at a hospital in Gusau, Nigeria.

    Sixteen-year-old Aisha Lausali (right) after delivering her first child at a hospital in Gusau, Nigeria. (Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCHIP)

    Thirteen million adolescents will give birth this year. And their challenges won’t end with delivery – these first-time and young parents (FT/YP) face unique risks that we must meet to help end preventable child and maternal deaths in a generation.

    Here’s what we know: women under age 20 are twice as likely to die in childbirth as women over 20. Early pregnancies limit educational achievement and income-generation potential, and they increase the risk of poor health outcomes for both young mothers and their children.

  • Blog post
    A group of children from the remote village of Antaralava in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar await health consultations from the Centre ValBio mobile health clinic.

    A group of children from the remote village of Antaralava in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar await health consultations from the Centre ValBio mobile health clinic. (Photo credit: Sophie Weiner)

    During my very first week at K4Health, I learned I would be travelling to Madagascar to help train members of the local Population-Health-Environment (PHE) network on storytelling techniques, and to conduct interviews with PHE-focused health care providers, recipients, and policy makers as part of K4Health’s Family Planning Voices initiative. New to the world of global health, this would be my first assignment in a low- or middle-income country. I was excited for the trip—an opportunity to feel a deeper connection to our work outside the office, but also slightly anxious about the unknown and overwhelmed by all the new information to learn.

  • Blog post

    This post was originally published by PRB.

    Men fishing off Rusinga Island, Kenya.

    Men fishing off Rusinga Island, Kenya. © Ryan Harvey, 2007. Licensed under Creative Commons: CC BY-SA 4.0

    Integrated approaches to development are gaining traction, especially as the global development community observes the one-year commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which highlight the interrelated relationships between many development sectors. One such integrated approach is known as Population, Health, and Environment (PHE), which seeks to provide voluntary family planning, improve people’s health, and conserve the environment in rural communities in an integrated, multisectoral manner.

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