Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation

K4Health's research, monitoring, and evaluation (RM&E) team applies rigorous mixed-method approaches to plan, assess, and document project activities. This is crucial to our ongoing improvement process--and it also produces strong, credible data to demonstrate the impact of activities over time. We have presented and published K4Health's research in several peer-reviewed contexts, to support understanding and appreciation of knowledge management among global health practitioners and to contribute to the evidence base for knowledge management in global health. 

K4Health's research staff:

  • Identifies knowledge needs, preferences, and promising evidence-based practices in the global health field, so that they can be incorporated into K4Health's other products and services
  • Conducts ongoing monitoring and evaluation, including the recent Family Planning Voices evaluation;
  • Designs and implements structured inquiries into our capacity strengthening engagements (such as K4Health's work in East Africa); and
  • Manages the Idea Lab, which tells us more about how people use K4Health's work.

In Practice

K4Health interviews MCH Director Niger MOH

K4Health Program Officer for Strategic Partnerships interviews Dr. Adama Kimou, Director of Maternal and Child Health, Ministry of Health, Niger

Background

Although each country faces unique challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, within a geographic region, governments, civil society organizations, and donors can benefit from learning from the experiences of their counterparts in other countries. K4Health partners with regional bodies to improve health in West Africa through strengthened collaboration, coordination, and knowledge management (KM).

Ouagadougou Partnership Knowledge Management Assessment

The Ouagadougou Partnership (OP) was created in 2011 and includes nine Francophone West African countries, donors, and civil society members with objectives to elevate the position of family planning in the social and economic landscape of the partnership countries, to accelerate the implementation of the countries’ family planning strategies and action plans, and to ensure coordination of donor investments. The Ouagadougou Partnership Coordinating Unit (OPCU) facilitates coordination among donors and member countries, as well as the sharing of information, progress, challenges, and successes among member countries.

Background

Although each country faces unique challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, within a geographic region, governments, civil society organizations, and donors can benefit from learning from the experiences of their counterparts in other countries. K4Health has partnered with two regional bodies to improve health in West Africa through strengthened collaboration, coordination, and knowledge management (KM).

Background

The symbiotic nature of health programs across the East Africa region presents both challenges and opportunities. Strong health systems and outcomes in one partner state contributes to another’s improvement, while poor health systems and outcomes can threaten its neighbors.

A regional approach is well recognized as a valuable and efficient path to support individual partner state health priorities as well as to scale up improved health outcomes. Regional Intergovernmental Organizations (RIGOs) play a key role in achieving improved health outcomes across the region by promoting collaboration and serving as a knowledge hub for partner states. Inhe East Africa region, which is comprised of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda, the East African Community plays this important convening role.

Despite the strong efforts of the RIGOs to coordinate and harmonize across the region, challenges remain with systematically collecting and sharing relevant and usable knowledge among partner states to improve their health programs. Partner states face challenges in accessing strategic information and knowledge from local and international researchers due to limitations of current sharing tools and strategies. The absence of a harmonized approach to using global and regional learning serves to weaken individual partner state programs, their advocacy agendas, and program implementation. Knowledge management is a powerful tool to address these challenges.

Blog

Daniel Adero

CCP | Knowledge Management Specialist
EAC Share Fair June 2018

The EAC Regional Share Fair will be held June 20-22 in Entebbe, Uganda. (Click to enlarge.)

The East African Community (EAC), like most other low- and middle-income regions, is grappling with a myriad of disease burdens ranging from common infections, nutritional challenges, and maternal mortality to non-communicable diseases to epidemics. Article 118 of the Treaty for the Establishment of the EAC calls for stronger regional cooperation on health among the partner states. Realization of this mandate requires effective management of the health sector knowledge resources.

The dynamic nature of the health sector presents a challenge: synthesis and sharing of knowledge among stakeholders and EAC partner states. Barriers include difficulties accessing information resources from both local and international sources and limited knowledge of and access to knowledge management tools and strategies.

Annē Linn

The Demographic and Health Surveys Program, CCP and ICF | Communications Associate
In Ghana, mother and son, Mercy and Daniel, lie under the insecticide-treated net (ITN) they received to protect them from malaria.

In Ghana, mother and son, Mercy and Daniel, lie under the insecticide-treated net (ITN) they received to protect them from malaria. 2016 Sarah Hoibak/VectorWorks, Courtesy of Photoshare.

Malaria continues to pose a tremendous public health threat around the globe. An estimated 3.3 billion people, or 40% of the world’s population, live in areas of malaria risk. The investments made in vector control, malaria in pregnancy, and prompt diagnosis and treatment of malaria infections have resulted in many successes, but challenges remain. One of these challenges is the question of how to best measure the fight against malaria.

Decision makers in malaria-endemic settings need to understand available data to answer programmatic questions and make informed decisions. What proportion of households in a country or region have at least one insecticide-treated net (ITN)? What proportion of the population used an ITN last night? What proportion of women received at least three doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to prevent malaria during their last pregnancy? What proportion of children with fever had advice or treatment sought for them? What proportion of children age 6-59 months are infected with malaria?

Lyndsey Mitchum

CCP | Program Coordinator
Mothers and children in Antaralava village in Ranomafana, Madagascar

Mothers and children in Antaralava Village, Ranomafana, Madagascar. Credit: 2017 David Alexander/CCP

On May 22, 2018, Family Planning 2020, Health Policy Plus (HP+), Palladium, and the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) project hosted Monitoring Matters: Tracking Progress Toward Family Planning Goals to discuss innovative tools within the Costed Implementation Plan (CIP) that are being used to help country governments accelerate their progress towards meeting family planning goals.

During this webinar, Family Planning 2020’s Eva Ros provided an overview of CIPs and the Costed Implementation Plan (CIP) Resource Kit, and discussed how countries at both national and sub-national levels are currently using CIPs. This tool, available on FP2020’s website, features guidance documents, resources, and best practices based on hands-on experience to assist program planners, ministry representatives, and technical assistance providers to go through the CIP process.

Resources

Family Planning Voices (FP Voices), created by K4Health and FP2020, documents and shares stories

What is the K4Health | Idea Lab?

Idea Lab logo small

The Idea Lab provides a chance for K4Health to hear feedback directly from users of our products and services as well as people who are new to K4Health’s offerings. This feedback on the content and the usability of our products helps us continually enhance K4Health's existing resources and develop useful, relevant new content.

Follow-up interviews with selected Idea Lab participants are the source for our Idea Lab stories--real people using K4Health's tools and resources in their work.

Organizations can use the Knowledge Management (KM) Index, a new evidence-based assessment tool, to measure capacity in four fundamental KM practice areas:

  1. Organizational structure (KM vision and strategy),
  2. Learning opportunities (professional development),
  3. Internal KM culture (seeking out and sharing knowledge), and
  4. KM for global health (efforts to advance global health agenda).