Africa, East

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    Get actionable steps to capture important knowledge gained from your work and effectively share that knowledge with others in the webinar presentation, “We’re doing all this good work: What are we learning and how do we share it?” from our Knowledge Management in Practice series.

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    In this PowerPoint presentation, Jennifer Tumusiime shares how in her role as Knowledge Management Advisor for EGPAF Uganda, she works to meet the knowledge needs of her team.

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    In this PowerPoint presentation, Leanne Kamau shares how in her role as Knowledge Management Technical Officer at FHI 360 Kenya, she works to meet the knowledge needs of her team.

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    Tumusiime share fair blog photo

    The East Africa Regional Share Fair attracted participants from many sectors.

    In his book Post-Capitalist Society, prominent management thinker and writer Peter F. Drucker notes, “Knowledge has become the key economic resource and the dominant—and perhaps even the only—source of competitive advantage.”

    How to make this a reality for East Africa informed most of the discussions at the Regional Share Fair conducted in Uganda in June 2018. The objective of the Share Fair was to collaboratively learn how to apply knowledge management (KM) tools, techniques, and approaches in the health sector.

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    In this PowerPoint, Doreen Othero presents the PHE Program at the Lake Victoria Basin Commission’s successful implementation of Population, Health, and Environment activities.

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    PHE Voices: Stories and Lessons Learned from Four Diverse Settings

    Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) experts from The Philippines, Madagascar, Ethiopia, and the Lake Victoria Basin share stories from the field. Photo credit: Meagan Harrison, courtesy of Photoshare.

    The Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) approach addresses the relationship between human health and environmental health in order to improve primary health care services, conserving biodiversity and natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. When development issues are addressed together, communities thrive.

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    The Share Fair exemplified the EAC's readiness to use knowledge management to ensure better integration and improved health outcomes for all of its citizens.

    The Share Fair exemplified the EAC's readiness to use knowledge management to ensure better integration and improved health outcomes for all of its citizens. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    If you have been engaged in global health work, you should know by now that knowledge management (KM) approaches have taken a central place in program implementation to improve health outcomes. While the practices are not new (in fact, they date back to old times, such as the Industrial Age, when knowledge was focused on machinery and human physical energy), the field has been growing. Knowledge once meant only accessing data and info, then developed into understanding gained from experience, analysis, and sharing. Now, knowledge management is more human centered and focused on around generating, capturing, sharing, and applying learning in order to achieve both customer satisfaction and innovation.

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    Panel discussion on the state of knowledge management integration in reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child, and adolescent health (RMNCAH) and HIV.

    Panel discussion on the state of knowledge management integration in reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child, and adolescent health (RMNCAH) and HIV. Photo: Nemuson Studios.

    Two years ago (2016), I participated in the first East African Community (EAC) Share Fair in Arusha, Tanzania, organized by Knowledge for Health (K4Health). While it was the first, the enthusiasm that accompanied the participation from the member states and implementing partners indicated a path to adoption of knowledge management practices. Fast forward two years, and we were in Uganda to not only take stock, but also determine how individual countries would integrate knowledge management toward better reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child, adolescent health and HIV (RMNCAH & HIV) programming.

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    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair.

    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    The alarm rings at exactly 6:30am on 20 June 2018. It seems like I have only just blinked. A brand new day ushers in the beginning of the EAC Regional Share Fair. I yawn, then I stretch. Then I snooze for a couple more minutes before I get ready. The previous day’s trip to Uganda was quite exhausting. It is unfortunate we still do not have a direct flight to Entebbe from Dar es Salaam. (Private jet from USAID next time?)

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    EAC Share Fair June 2018

    The EAC Regional Share Fair will be held June 20-22 in Entebbe, Uganda. (Click to enlarge.)

    The East African Community (EAC), like most other low- and middle-income regions, is grappling with a myriad of disease burdens ranging from common infections, nutritional challenges, and maternal mortality to non-communicable diseases to epidemics. Article 118 of the Treaty for the Establishment of the EAC calls for stronger regional cooperation on health among the partner states. Realization of this mandate requires effective management of the health sector knowledge resources.

    The dynamic nature of the health sector presents a challenge: synthesis and sharing of knowledge among stakeholders and EAC partner states. Barriers include difficulties accessing information resources from both local and international sources and limited knowledge of and access to knowledge management tools and strategies.

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