• Courtney Calvin

    USAID LEARN | Knowledge Management Specialist

    This post originally appeared on the USAID Learning Lab blog, Lab Notes.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    The K4Health Knowledge Management Share Fair in Arusha, Tanzania brought together over 80 knowledge managers in the public health sector from Sub-Saharan Africa to catalyze a knowledge-sharing community and raise awareness of the role of knowledge management (KM) in international development. More than a typical conference, the Share Fair was an opportunity for international development practitioners representing ministries of health, intergovernmental agencies, and USAID implementing partners to interact and learn how to incorporate KM into their processes together.

  • Kim Martin

    Health Communication Capacity Collaborative | Communications Director

    This post originally appeared on the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) blog.

    HC3 LARCs video

    A short animated video features Maria, a health care provider at a community clinic.

    Most sexually active adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa are not using modern methods of contraception. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs) are highly effective, convenient and cost-effective, their uptake among young women is low.

  • Kelli Schmitz

    Peace Corps | Volunteer/Rural Community Health Specialist, Benin

    This post originally appeared on the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) blog.*

    Henriette Tossa is a mother of two living in Benin.

    Henriette Tossa is a mother of two living in Benin.

    Henriette Tossa is a mother of two and a community health educator working and living in southern Benin where, according to the Benin Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), the total fertility rate is 4.9 children per woman and the contraceptive prevalence rate of modern methods is 8 percent. Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) remain stigmatized and unpopular relative to other methods, with intrauterine device (IUD) use at .5 percent and implants at 1 percent.

  • Willow Gerber

    Management Sciences for Health | Senior Technical Advisor for Knowledge Exchange and Innovation
    The share fair's interactive expectation wall. Photo by Cassandra Mickish Gross.

    The share fair's interactive expectation wall. Photo by Cassandra Mickish Gross.

    I had the pleasure of facilitating a knowledge management (KM) share fair last month in Arusha, Tanzania. The objectives of the event were fairly standard, but the event wasn’t. Thanks to a faulty Wi-Fi connection on the morning of the first day, the audience had to connect with each other rather than with far-flung staffers on email and Internet harbingers of distraction. I was very lucky to have the bully pulpit for part of the fair, and as part of the ever-important post-event feedback loop, here are three of the most important lessons I learned. I hope you’ll consider these when and if you bring a big group of people together to learn from each other and to take another step up the proverbial KM mountain.

  • JoAnn Paradis

    Management Sciences for Health | Strategic Communications Advisor, African Strategies for Health
    Share fair participants Melissa Kirowo and Wycliffe Omanya consider networks for sharing knowledge. Copyright Eva Schiffer. Photo by Jarret Cassaniti.

    Share fair participants Melissa Kirowo and Wycliffe Omanya consider networks for sharing knowledge. Copyright Eva Schiffer. Photo by Jarret Cassaniti, courtesy of Photoshare.

    As a communicator and advocate in public health, I’ve learned that in order to strengthen or change policies and practices for better health, it is critical to ensure that knowledge about what does and doesn’t work is effectively and systematically captured, disseminated, and applied. Through my work, I am constantly reminded of the interconnectedness and catalytic relationships between strong knowledge management (KM), effective communications efforts, and successful advocacy.

  • Alexandrina Nakanwagi

    PACE Uganda | Communications Assistant

    Goretti Masadde

    PACE Uganda | Head of Social Marketing

    Andrea Mooney, MPH

    Populations Services International | Communications and Knowledge Management Advisor
    Copper IUDs are the most effective form of EC, and in Uganda, the cost is less than half that of EC pills. Photo: PACE Uganda

    Copper IUDs are the most effective form of EC. In Uganda, the cost is less than half that of EC pills. Photo: PACE Uganda

    Every day in Uganda, women die from unsafe abortion-related causes, mostly due to unplanned pregnancies. Though general knowledge of modern contraception is high, married women still face a 34% unmet need for contraception—and while around 30% of all Ugandan women know about emergency contraception (EC), fewer than 1% actually use it.

  • Carol Karutu

    IntraHealth International | Chief of Party, FUNZOKenya Project
    A client receives counseling from health workers

    A client receives counseling from health workers.

    Contraceptive uptake among women in Kenya has steadily risen over the last ten years, and injectables and implants have emerged as the most popular modern methods.

    But who is meeting this growing demand for family planning information and services?

  • Kate Plourde, MPH

    FHI 360 | Technical Officer, Research Utilization
    A group of girls live in a shelter after being removed from their homes and sold into prostitution in Guadalajara, Mexico. © 2008 Lynn VanderWielen, Courtesy of Photoshare

    A group of girls live in a shelter after being removed from their homes and sold into prostitution in Guadalajara, Mexico. © 2008 Lynn VanderWielen, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Over the past few years, the global public health community has recognized that addressing adolescent and youth sexual and reproductive health (AYSRH) is key to achieving international development goals such as those set forth by FP2020. This, coupled with increased commitments to AYSRH by donor agencies, governments, global leaders, and international partnerships, has moved AYSRH to the forefront of the global health agenda. The increased attention to AYSRH highlights the importance of ensuring that adolescents and youth have access to the information, support, and services they need for a healthy transition into adulthood. This requires that we implement evidence-based programmatic approaches that are tailored to meet the multifaceted needs of young people.

  • K4Health Highlights

    Elizabeth Futrell

    CCP | Content Development Lead
    IUDs are displayed on a table at the counseling unit in Yusuf Dantsoho memorial hospital in Nigeria’s northern city of Kaduna. © 2012 Akintunde Akinleye/NURHI, Courtesy of Photoshare

    IUDs are displayed on a table at the counseling unit in Yusuf Dantsoho memorial hospital in Nigeria’s northern city of Kaduna. © 2012 Akintunde Akinleye/NURHI, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Long-acting reversible contraceptives, or LARCs, are getting a lot of attention these days. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released new guidelines recommending that LARCs be the “first line” of contraceptives for preventing adolescent pregnancy in the U.S. In other words, pediatricians should recommend LARCs such as IUDs and implants before shorter-term contraceptive methods such as condoms and pills for teens. Days later, The New England Journal of Medicine published the impressive results of a study showing that providing adolescent girls in the U.S. with information about, and affordable access to, LARCs can reduce rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion by more than 75%.

  • Wycliffe Omanya

    IntraHealth International Kenya | Knowledge Management and Communications Manager
    Official opening of the Knowledge Management Share Fair held in Arusha, Tanzania. Photo: Wycliffe Omanya

    Official opening of the Knowledge Management Share Fair held in Arusha, Tanzania. Photo: Wycliffe Omanya

    It is said that whoever has knowledge wields power. This is true, but it is also true that knowledge is a factor of people. A world is emerging where whoever shares and manages knowledge better is possibly the most powerful.

    The East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community Knowledge Management Share Fair event brought together over 80 professionals from 15 countries to Arusha, Tanzania. I was grateful to attend, representing IntraHealth in Kenya. This Share Fair was hailed as a transformative first step toward a professional pool working in global health and development to learn from each other, strengthen existing networks, build new ones, and influence future activities in the health sector. The emerging community of knowledge management experts will help provide a regional response to the Sustainable Development Goals.

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