• Amy Lee

    CCP | Program Specialist
    Amino LARC data

    Who uses long-acting birth control? Via Amino.

    In the world of international development, data visualization is in the spotlight—but is it stealing the show from other content adaptation approaches?

    Data visualizations are undeniably powerful. They can clearly convey a complex story to a particular audience, and when done correctly, can serve as a call to action.

  • David Potenziani

    IntraHealth International | Senior Informatics Advisor
    Tinkertoys

    Tinkertoys. Photo by Peter Miller (via Flickr); Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic license (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

    The 2016 Global Digital Health Forum offered a variety of sessions and formats. From simultaneous interactive workshops, panel presentations and fireside chats, one of the challenges for me was that I found all of the content so compelling, I had a hard time prioritizing sessions. One cannot be everywhere—although Co-Chairs Amanda BenDor and Heidi Good Boncana tried to be—and any one person’s observations are really anecdotal. Well, here are my anecdotes.

  • Jarret Cassaniti

    CCP | Program Officer
    Global Digital Health Forum panelists: Sam Wambugu, Mark Cardwell, Siobhan Green, Melissa Sabatier.

    Global Digital Health Forum panelists: Sam Wambugu, Mark Cardwell, Siobhan Green, Melissa Sabatier. Photo: Jarret Cassaniti, 2016

    Data is a powerful tool that can help managers improve health care delivery to the people they serve. During the two days I spent at the Global Digital Health Forum, big data was referenced and audience-first approaches were frequently discussed. Data visualizations were also mentioned as an effective way to deliver meaningful messages. And, they can be as simple as developing a pie chart or table.

  • David Olson

    Olson Global Communications | Principal
    A DKT Nigeria community health worker gives Sayana Press injectable contraceptive to a woman in the Makoko slum of Lagos, Nigeria.

    A DKT Nigeria community health worker gives Sayana Press injectable contraceptive to a woman in the Makoko slum of Lagos, Nigeria. Photo by David Olson.

    The Nigerian government has approved Sayana Press injectable contraceptive for self-injection by users, a change which advocates hope will improve access to the product. The United Kingdom has already approved self-injection. Other countries are considering doing the same.

    Sayana Press is the three-month progestin-only injectable contraceptive that combines the drug and needle in a Uniject™ injection system. It is small, light, easy-to-use, and requires minimal training, making it ideal for rural settings and community-based distribution efforts and, increasingly, for women to administer themselves.

  • Sam Wambugu

    MEASURE Evaluation | Senior Health Informatics Specialist

    This post was originally published by MEASURE Evaluation.

    Sam Wambugu speaks with Global Digital Health Forum attendees.

    Sam Wambugu speaks with Global Digital Health Forum attendees. Photo by Jim Thomas, MEASURE Evaluation.

    Last week at National Harbor, Maryland, I and about 500 others from around the world gathered at the Global Digital Health Forum 2016 to talk about ways in which digital technology is being used to improve the efficiency of health information systems and improve health overall. In particular, my eyes and ears were tuned to digital health data ethics, security and confidentiality because my organization, MEASURE Evaluation, plays a role here and because this is a concern essential to effective harnessing of technology that needs more attention.

  • Amanda Puckett BenDor

    IntraHealth International | Technical Advisor, HRH and Knowledge Management
    In Brebes, Central Java, Indonesia, a village-level family planning volunteer, or cadre, plays a quiz game as part of a new mobile application for family planning.

    In Brebes, Central Java, Indonesia, a village-level family planning volunteer, or cadre, plays a quiz game as part of a new mobile application for family planning. © 2016 Radha Rajan, Courtesy of Photoshare

    The 2016 Global Digital Health Forum brought together over 425 collaborators working in global digital health. What struck me this year is how our community is committed to working together to apply the 9 Principles of Digital Development and implement digital tools and systems to improve health. As we further explore interoperability and building on existing tools, we must partner to leapfrog over obstacles. The private sector, NGOs, ministries, and individuals are developing new relationships and partnerships to move the dial forward in global digital health.

  • Agbonkhese Oaiya

    IntraHealth International | Regional HIS Advisor for Informatics Portfolio
    Amada Ndorbor (right), Director of the Mental Health Unit, Ministry of Health Liberia. Photo: Agbonkhese Oaiya

    Amada Ndorbor (right), Director of the Mental Health Unit, Ministry of Health Liberia. Photo: Agbonkhese Oaiya

    In November 2016, K4Health began working alongside the Ministry of Health in Liberia to support mHero, a two-way SMS system that allows Ministries of Health and frontline health workers to connect. Building on the work supported by USAID through the Ebola Grand Challenge and previous activities supported by K4Health, this one-year activity seeks to work alongside UNICEF and local partners, supporting the Liberia Ministry of Health to continue to scale mHero. I was asked to join the IntraHealth team working on this exciting new K4Health project and support an mHero Roadmap Workshop in early November.

  • David Potenziani

    IntraHealth International | Senior Informatics Advisor
    PharmAccess mHealth program

    PharmAccess mHealth program. Photo by PharmAccess Foundation via Wikimedia Commons under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

    On December 7, K4Health hosted the second webinar in a two-part series, Digital Health’s Missing Link: Knowledge Management. The webinar series explores how knowledge management can help the digital health field through understanding what has been done before and use that information to inform the planning and execution of our current efforts. The first webinar highlighted knowledge management resources and repositories that already exist and can help project leaders during the preparation and initiation phases. In the second, we highlighted specifically how digital health implementers use certain tools and methods to document and share knowledge through their projects.

  • Amanda Puckett BenDor

    IntraHealth International | Technical Advisor, HRH and Knowledge Management
    WHO's Digital Health Atlas

    The Digital Health Atlas offers technologists, implementers, financial investors, and governments a platform of tools and guidance to improve the use of digital innovations for health.

    When planning our digital health implementations, we have good intentions. We seek input from stakeholders, follow the 9 Principles of Development, and carefully plan for scale. What we often fail to do is gain a thorough understanding of what has been done before and use that information to inform the planning of our own interventions. But where do we go to find this information?

  • Bergen Cooper

    Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE) | Director of Policy Research
    Adolescent girls and young women enrolled in DREAMS through Hope Worldwide Kenya after meeting with CHANGE in Mukuru Kwa Reuben, Nairobi, Kenya.

    Adolescent girls and young women enrolled in DREAMS through Hope Worldwide Kenya after meeting with CHANGE in Mukuru Kwa Reuben, Nairobi, Kenya. Courtesy of Bergen Cooper.

    We know what works to prevent HIV. Over the course of the epidemic, we have seen the body of evidence grow. Unfortunately, in too many cases, we have also seen donors and implementers favor interventions based on ideology rather than data. In order to address HIV, there’s no question that we need to program the standard interventions like condoms, pre-exposure prophylaxis, and post-exposure prophylaxis. Yet we also need to address areas not consistently included in HIV prevention, including family planning, gender-based violence, education, access to employment, and social norms. On this World AIDS Day, I am filled with hope: A program is finally doing just that.

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