What We Learned at Global Health Mini-University

K4Health Highlights

Simone Parrish

CCP | Global Repository Director

Sidhartha Deka

Formerly CCP | Program Officer

Sara Mazursky

CCP | Deputy Director

Angela Nash-Mercado

Formerly CCP | Partnerships Director

Naheed Ahmed

(Formerly) CCP | M & E Program Officer

Ann Hendrix-Jenkins

Futures Group International | ‎Technical Director: Capacity Building

Libby Skolnik

MLE Project, CCP | KM Manager

Saori Ohkubo

CCP | Sr. Program Officer, M&E

Tara Sullivan

CCP | Director

On Friday, March 7, the Global Health Mini-University kicked off at George Washington University. Hosted by USAID’s Global Health Professional and Organizational Development Program, the daylong event brought together global health professionals and students for sharing technical knowledge and networking.

Several K4Health staff attended, and shared these highlights. What did you learn? Tell us in the comments.

Simone Parrish

K4Health and WASH hosted "Cooking Up Knowledge Management: Recipes for Practitioners" at the 2014 Global Health Mini-University

K4Health and WASH hosted "Cooking Up Knowledge Management: Recipes for Practitioners" at the 2014 Global Health Mini-University.

A taste of our own cooking: As presenters, we felt well-prepared for the KM Kitchen session--hats, aprons, slides, handouts, the works. What we didn’t do was follow one of our own pieces of advice. At my “Before the Basics” knowledge café table, I covered usable design, readability, and basic content curation concepts. I encouraged people to avoid jargon wherever possible; using language your audience understands is critical to effective knowledge-sharing. So it might have been helpful if we had opened our session with some definitions of knowledge management. Lesson learned!

Sidhartha Deka

At MSH’s “Proximal, Distal, and Everything In-Between: Measuring Organization Capacity”, the MSH Leadership, Management, and Governance team’s session on measuring organizational capacity brought me back to K4Health’s implementation of the Bangladesh Knowledge Management Initiative. The session highlighted the importance of an M&E framework in a greater logic model that shows successes or failures of capacity development in civil society organizations. BKMI took this approach and demonstrated that certain KM structures became part of the organizational culture in Bangladesh’s health communication-focused governmental entities and implementing partners. BKMI’s efforts can serve as a model toward institutionalizing KM as a part of improving organizational performance and efficiency in the national level. I especially think that people-centered KM approaches such as learning and knowledge exchange are salient toward building trust and strong leadership for health.  

Sara Mazursky

A skit about midwives drives home the statistic: nearly every two minutes, a woman dies in childbirth

A skit about midwives drives home the statistic: nearly every two minutes, a woman dies in childbirth.

While the woman in this picture eventually "died" as part of a fictitious scenario, the reality is that this scenario plays out on a regular basis in many parts of the world – nearly every two minutes a woman dies in childbirth.

Jhpiego presented the session "A practical way to maintain skills wherever providers deliver babies", which was a hands-on session where we really got a feel for how the Saving Mothers, Giving Life training is conducted. We were able to see how a low-tech model ($150) is being used to help providers learn proper techniques on the active management of the third stage of labor (AMSTL) to reduce post-partum hemorrhaging.

Angela Nash-Mercado

In the “Integration of Family Planning Services into MNCH Programming in Liberia” session, Curamericas Global presented how they introduced a community-based family planning program into a child survival project in Liberia. They saw the contraceptive prevalence rate increase and have maintained the increase and I believe it’s due to their comprehensive approach of improving counseling and services as well as mobilizing the community. Many of their audience are farmers and the photo symbolizes how you wouldn’t plant your crops so close together so the same goes for spacing children.

Naheed Ahmed

Data Visualization was discussed at "Cooking Up Knowledge Management: Recipes for Practitioners" at the 2014 Global Health Mini-University

Data Visualization was discussed at "Cooking Up Knowledge Management: Recipes for Practitioners" at the 2014 Global Health Mini-University.

When creating a data visualization, think about your audience – what do you want them to learn and do with the information you present in your visualization?

Ann Hendrix-Jenkins

Simple and Practical: MCHIP’s breakdown of postpartum family planning into seven discrete social and behavior change activities, independently but complementary. A depth of knowledge and expertise distilled into something anyone can quickly understand and use, as we did in small groups during our session, "Cooking Up Knowledge Management: Recipes for Practitioners."

Libby Skolnik

To work in global health, versatility is the greatest attribute

"To work in global health, versatility is the greatest attribute." Jim Shelton's pearl for global health students and practitioners at the 2014 Global Health Mini-University.

Responding to interest and intrigue in data visualization, my colleagues Amanda Makulec at JSI and Erica Nybro at the DHS Program and I have created an online space for exchanging information, resources, tools and dialog related to data viz. We’re learning, exchanging ideas and making messages so visually compelling that they inspire action.  Check it out and join the hub

Saori Ohkubo

From the session titled “Bringing Together Public and Private Sectors for Health Impact,” I learned that everyone in a market needs to be on the same page: global health missions can turn competitors in consumer markets into collaborators.

Tara Sullivan

Gender integration is important throughout the program cycle. Gender activities should 'do no harm' and move across the gender integration continuum from awareness to transformation.

Kate Plourde

Body Map

Body Maping, a new resource for support group facilitators for working with ALHIV.

Body mapping, presented as a part of FHI 360’s session on a new resource for support group facilitators working with ALHIV, is an innovative tool typically used for art therapy that can be used by young people living with HIV to understand their identity outside of their diagnosis, to build confidence, and to envision themselves actively participating in the management of their care.

Marta Pirzadeh

Adolescence is awkward, for everyone around the world. We can all think of embarrassing moments we experienced and inaccurate information we received. During the Institute for Reproductive Health (IRH) at Georgetown University’s session participants discussed the importance of correct information about puberty for very young adolescents.