• Patrick Segawa

    Public Health Ambassadors Uganda | Programme Coordinator
    Patrick Segawa leads a group of young activists in a flash mob during the Women Deliver conference.

    Patrick Segawa leads a group of young activists in a flash mob during the Women Deliver conference.

    PHAU Team Leader Patrick Segawa, an SRH Avenger and Women Deliver Young Leader, reflects on some of his favorite moments at the Women Deliver conference.

    Recently, more than 5,500 people met in Copenhagen, Denmark for Women Deliver’s 4th Global Conference. They gathered to share their experiences, challenges, and lessons and to advocate for improved access to health, education, participation, and investment for girls and women.

  • Jill Sergison

    FHI 360 | Associate Scientist

    Rebecca Callahan

    FHI 360 | Scientist
    During a village gathering to discuss family planning, a woman in a village near Shashemene, Ethiopia, proudly shows off her arm where Norplant is implanted. © 2005 Virginia Lamprecht, Courtesy of Photoshare

    During a village gathering to discuss family planning, a woman in a village near Shashemene, Ethiopia, proudly shows off her arm where Norplant is implanted. © 2005 Virginia Lamprecht, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods appeal to many women because they are highly effective, discreet, and forgettable—once in place, no regular action is required on the part of the user. Because of their long duration of effectiveness, they can also be more cost-effective for individuals, family planning programs, and donors compared with short-acting methods such as oral contraceptive pills or condoms.

  • Carla Visser

    Management Sciences for Health (South Africa) | Team Lead, Special Programs
    Carla Visser and Willow Gerber enjoy an evening in Arusha.

    Carla Visser and Willow Gerber enjoy an evening in Arusha.

    Visiting Tanzania is a privilege—and more so when it is to participate in an event focusing on one of my passions: knowledge management. The East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community Knowledge Management (KM) Share Fair took place April 13-14, 2016 in Arusha with the theme of “peer-to-peer sharing.” There I had the opportunity to connect with fellow knowledge management professionals from 14 countries and territories and learn about approaches and innovations from the region. With panel discussions, knowledge cafés, group activities and social events, the structure of the meeting truly complemented its theme.

  • Esther Pak

    Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health | Communications Specialist, PMA2020
    PMA2020 data informs where development efforts should be targeted

    PMA2020 data informs where development efforts should be targeted, including poverty reduction, health care access for all (especially girls and women), and improved access to water and sanitation sources. Photo: PMA2020

    On May 16-19, 2016, Performance Monitoring and Accountability 2020, a mobile technology-based population survey project based within The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will join global health leaders, advocates, researchers, policy makers, and others at the fourth Women Deliver conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women Deliver is one of the first global conferences since the launch of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), or Global Goals, last September. The theme at this year’s conference is the SDGs and specifically, the implementation of these Global Goals, with a focus on health—in particular, maternal, sexual, and reproductive health and rights.

  • Stella Kagwiria Muthuri, PhD

    African Population and Health Research Center | Post-Doctoral Fellow
    PhotoVoice gives participants an opportunity to capture the conditions around them, reflect on these conditions or their experiences, and develop strategies to reach policymakers. Photo: APHRC/GrOW Team

    PhotoVoice gives participants an opportunity to capture the conditions around them, reflect on these conditions or their experiences, and develop strategies to reach policy makers. Photo: APHRC/GrOW Team

    I was invited to participate in the Knowledge Management for Health Share Fair held in Arusha, Tanzania between April 13th and 15th. The share fair was well attended, with representatives from 14 countries, allowing for engaging conversations about various knowledge management tools and techniques that may revolutionize the health sector and how information is shared.

  • Courtney Calvin

    USAID LEARN | Knowledge Management Specialist

    This post originally appeared on the USAID Learning Lab blog, Lab Notes.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    The K4Health Knowledge Management Share Fair in Arusha, Tanzania brought together over 80 knowledge managers in the public health sector from Sub-Saharan Africa to catalyze a knowledge-sharing community and raise awareness of the role of knowledge management (KM) in international development. More than a typical conference, the Share Fair was an opportunity for international development practitioners representing ministries of health, intergovernmental agencies, and USAID implementing partners to interact and learn how to incorporate KM into their processes together.

  • Kim Martin

    Health Communication Capacity Collaborative | Communications Director

    This post originally appeared on the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) blog.

    HC3 LARCs video

    A short animated video features Maria, a health care provider at a community clinic.

    Most sexually active adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa are not using modern methods of contraception. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs) are highly effective, convenient and cost-effective, their uptake among young women is low.

  • Kelli Schmitz

    Peace Corps | Volunteer/Rural Community Health Specialist, Benin

    This post originally appeared on the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) blog.*

    Henriette Tossa is a mother of two living in Benin.

    Henriette Tossa is a mother of two living in Benin.

    Henriette Tossa is a mother of two and a community health educator working and living in southern Benin where, according to the Benin Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), the total fertility rate is 4.9 children per woman and the contraceptive prevalence rate of modern methods is 8 percent. Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) remain stigmatized and unpopular relative to other methods, with intrauterine device (IUD) use at .5 percent and implants at 1 percent.

  • Willow Gerber

    Management Sciences for Health | Senior Technical Advisor for Knowledge Exchange and Innovation
    The share fair's interactive expectation wall. Photo by Cassandra Mickish Gross.

    The share fair's interactive expectation wall. Photo by Cassandra Mickish Gross.

    I had the pleasure of facilitating a knowledge management (KM) share fair last month in Arusha, Tanzania. The objectives of the event were fairly standard, but the event wasn’t. Thanks to a faulty Wi-Fi connection on the morning of the first day, the audience had to connect with each other rather than with far-flung staffers on email and Internet harbingers of distraction. I was very lucky to have the bully pulpit for part of the fair, and as part of the ever-important post-event feedback loop, here are three of the most important lessons I learned. I hope you’ll consider these when and if you bring a big group of people together to learn from each other and to take another step up the proverbial KM mountain.

  • JoAnn Paradis

    Management Sciences for Health | Strategic Communications Advisor, African Strategies for Health
    Share fair participants Melissa Kirowo and Wycliffe Omanya consider networks for sharing knowledge. Copyright Eva Schiffer. Photo by Jarret Cassaniti.

    Share fair participants Melissa Kirowo and Wycliffe Omanya consider networks for sharing knowledge. Copyright Eva Schiffer. Photo by Jarret Cassaniti, courtesy of Photoshare.

    As a communicator and advocate in public health, I’ve learned that in order to strengthen or change policies and practices for better health, it is critical to ensure that knowledge about what does and doesn’t work is effectively and systematically captured, disseminated, and applied. Through my work, I am constantly reminded of the interconnectedness and catalytic relationships between strong knowledge management (KM), effective communications efforts, and successful advocacy.

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