• Community-Based Family Planning

    Colin Gilmartin

    Management Sciences for Health | Senior Technical Officer

    This piece originally appeared in Global Health Now.

    Community Health Volunteer in a remote village of Tulear, Madagascar, giving instructions to a client on the use of pregnancy tests.

    Community Health Volunteer in a remote village of Tulear, Madagascar, giving instructions to a client on the use of pregnancy tests. Image by Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

    How countries can move toward building sustainable community health programs

    Universal health coverage (UHC) is increasingly recognized as the best way to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal targets on health. But with 400 million people lacking access to essential health services and a projected shortage of 18 million health workers, it will take unprecedented effort and funding. Community health workers (CHWs) could be an important part of the solution—but without effective investments and sound planning, we will fall short of achieving UHC.

  • Linking Family Planning and Global Development

    Daniel Adero

    CCP | Knowledge Management Specialist
    PHE champions in Bisoro Commune, Burundi at their demonstration site.

    PHE champions in Bisoro Commune, Burundi at their demonstration site.

    On September 27-28, 2017, the Lake Victoria Basin Commission (LVBC), in partnership with USAID/Kenya East Africa, the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project and Population Reference Bureau (PRB), will host a regional Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) Symposium in Entebbe, Uganda. The theme of the symposium is Enhancing Resiliency and Economic Development through Strengthened PHE Programming.

  • mHealth

    Anne Kott

    CCP | Communications Director
    Frontline health workers (FLWs) receive training on the use of smartphones and the mSehat mobile health platform in rural Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Frontline health workers (FLWs) receive training on the use of smartphones and the mSehat mobile health platform in rural Uttar Pradesh, India. ©2015 Girdhari Bora/SIFPSA mSehat, Courtesy of Photoshare.

    Registration is now open for the fourth annual Global Digital Health Forum (December 4-6, 2017), a premier gathering for digital health professionals from around the world.

    The theme for this year’s Forum—The Evolving Digital Health Landscape: Progress, Achievements, and Remaining Frontiers—captures the spirit of progress made in the past several years to scale digital health systems and also encourages us to look critically at the continued need for innovation, as well as integration, to improve health outcomes in a changing political landscape.

  • Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy

    Joseph Kasaija

    Public Health Ambassadors Uganda | Project Officer
    Religious leaders have often been left out of SRHR advocacy strategies, yet their influence is critical.

    Religious leaders have often been left out of SRHR advocacy strategies, yet their influence is critical. 

    Uganda is characterised by a diversity of religious groups and practices, each with its own perceptions of sexuality education. As culture and religion are intertwined, many believers still practice some cultural values and norms to live harmoniously in their communities. Parents and religious leaders often have misconceptions of sexuality education, so there has been a gap in strengthening advocacy efforts to implement a sexuality education policy in Uganda.

  • Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy

    Margarite Nathe

    IntraHealth International | Senior Editor/Writer

    This post originally appeared on The Huffington Post and on IntraHealth's blog, VITAL.

    "Being a youth ambassador has changed my life."

    "Being a youth ambassador has changed my life," Abou Diallo says. "I’ve become more and more the person I dream of being. Young people and adults come to me now for information on reproductive health and family planning." Photo courtesy of Abou Diallo.

    Young leaders have the power to reach their peers and communities in ways most government officials can’t.

    Abou Diallo was on vacation with his family when his girlfriend showed up to see him, agitated and worried. She hadn’t had her period for two months, she told him. A pregnancy test confirmed their fears.

  • Linking Family Planning and Global Development

    Oluyemisi Falope

    University of South Florida | Doctoral Student/Research Associate
    NGOs have established temporary clinics for IDPs in Northeastern Nigeria, but sexual and reproductive health services are still largely inadequate.

    NGOs have established temporary clinics for IDPs in Northeastern Nigeria, but sexual and reproductive health services are still largely inadequate. Photo: Oluyemisi Falope

    When I arrived, the insurgency was still trying to push back, launching attacks and using suicide bombers; the Nigerian army fought back. We could hear and feel bombs and shells going off every now and then. It is not something you get accustomed to: You just say your prayers and hope it is the soldiers warding off the insurgents.

  • Engaging Men and Boys in Family Planning

    Leah J. Kenny

    WIL Uganda | Reproductive and Sexual Health Intern
    Male students take part in the sexual and reproductive health programme at Townside Secondary School, Busembatia.

    Male students take part in the sexual and reproductive health programme at Townside Secondary School, Busembatia. Photo: Noraly Schiet, 2017

    In Eastern Uganda, when a teenage girl becomes pregnant, she will stop attending school and instead, begin a life rearing children and looking after the family home and land. Teenage pregnancy remains high in Uganda, where more than one-third of girls give birth before the age of 18. Predictably, this is higher in rural areas. As well as teenage pregnancy, women and girls here face many sexual and reproductive health (SRH) challenges throughout their lives, including sex in exchange for “necessities,” poor menstrual hygiene, and a lack of access to family planning methods. This is why teaching and empowering girls from a young age about sexual and reproductive health and rights is a must. As part of the small grassroots organisation Women in Leadership (WIL) Uganda, based in Busembatia, for the last three months I have been doing just that across a number of schools.

  • Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy

    This piece, including a slideshow of youth ambassadors, was originally published on IntraHealth International's blog, VITAL.

    Romaric Ouitona, president of Youth Ambassadors in Benin, speaks to his peers at a youth center that offers family planning services and education in Dangbo, Benin.

    Romaric Ouitona, president of Youth Ambassadors in Benin, speaks to his peers at a youth center that offers family planning services and education in Dangbo, Benin. Photo by Trevor Snapp for IntraHealth International.

    They’re informed, determined, and looking ahead for the good of their peers—and their countries.

    They want to help girls stay in school. To take control of their own futures. To make sure other young people don’t make the same mistakes or have to live the same nightmares they did.

  • Elizabeth Tully

    CCP | Program Officer
    Fatouma Nina Koné, a Family Planning Youth Ambassador from Burkina Faso, was recently featured on FP Voices.

    Fatouma Nina Koné, a Family Planning Youth Ambassador from Burkina Faso, was recently featured on FP Voices.

    In my role on the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project, I work on a number of initiatives and activities, all from my cozy home office in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Over the last few years, between pregnancies, breastfeeding, and caring for two small children, I’ve stayed close to home. At the same time, I’ve watched my colleagues travel the world, interviewing family planning policy makers, implementers, service providers, and clients for Family Planning Voices, the global storytelling initiative we lead in partnership with Family Planning 2020. I get the opportunity to review all of our stories, schedule them for publication, and post them to our photo blog and social media sites. But I share something in common with our readers: I have never met most of the individuals whose stories I shepherd through the publication process, and I probably never will.

  • mHealth

    Saadia Azim

    Freelance Journalist
    Sunita Prajapati, right, an accredited social health activist, counsels village women on maternal health at her village in Uttar Pradesh, India. Prajapati owns an Android phone with two specific apps, part of the ReMIND program, in which she maintains the

    Sunita Prajapati, right, an accredited social health activist, counsels village women on maternal health at her village in Uttar Pradesh, India. Prajapati owns an Android phone with two specific apps, part of the ReMIND program, in which she maintains the record of all the pregnant and lactating mothers in her vicinity. (Credit: Jen Hardy/CNS-Catholic Relief Services.)

    This piece was originally published by Crux.

    KOLKATA, India—Usha Devi, a 25-year-old field worker, is three months pregnant with her third child. But this child, she said confidently, will be born in the hospital.

    “Unlike my previous pregnancies, now I know when to call the ambulance,” Devi told Catholic News Service by phone.

    Devi is keeping all of her pregnancy details stored on an app in Sunita Prajapati’s mobile phone, and she knows she will receive reminders of all the important dates.