• Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Elizabeth Tully

    CCP | Program Officer
    Participants enjoy a proverb icebreaker exercise at the start of the Share Fair.

    Participants enjoy a proverb icebreaker exercise at the start of the Share Fair. Photo: Zwade Studio 

    The K4Health Project has hosted a number of share fairs since our initial Global Health Knowledge Management Share Fair, which was held in Washington, D.C., in April 2013. Our guide walking others through the process of hosting a share fair, How to Hold a Successful Share Fair, is even in its second edition. Although I attended our first share fair, I was not closely involved in the planning process. So when I had the opportunity to be part of a small planning team for a share fair being held in the Caribbean region, I was eager to contribute to our growing body of knowledge on planning an effective share fair.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Luis Ortiz Echevarría

    Management Sciences for Health (MSH) | Senior Manager, Knowledge Management and Learning
    KM Indicator Library

    GHKC's KM Indicator Library

    For international development programs to be effective, maximize performance, and be better stewards of resources, they must be able to successfully adapt in response to changes and new information. The ability to do so requires accepting that programmatic change does not usually follow linear and predictable paths, giving way to an environment that promotes learning and to a project design that is flexible. This flexibility minimizes the obstacles to program modifications and creates the space for adaptive management.

  • Anne Kott

    CCP | Communications Director
    March Workshop New Date

    Due to forecasted snowfall in the DC area, we are postponing the “Tools to Build Better Programs” workshop until Thursday, March 29, 8:30am – 1:00pm. This event will be held in Washington, DC at the FHI 360 conference center.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Leslie Heyer

    Cycle Technologies | Founder and President
    CycleBeads and mobile phone

    Two ways to use CycleBeads: the physical product and the app. Courtesy of Cycle Technologies, Inc.

    Millions of women in low- and middle-income countries have used evidence-based fertility awareness methods over the past several years. Most of them have used CycleBeads®, a low-cost, easy-to-use way for a woman to track her menstrual cycles and determine whether she is on a fertile day. CycleBeads are based on the Standard Days Method®, which has been proven over 95% effective in perfect use and 88% effective in typical use. It’s designed for women with cycles between 26-32 days long. CycleBeads has been widely successful because of its ease of use (it relies only on period tracking), lack of side effects, and its acceptability in a range of cultural contexts.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Hawa Talla

    IntraHealth International | Deputy Chief of Party, Senegal
    A provider at a health center in Senegal holds the injectable contraceptive, subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press).

    A provider at a health center in Senegal holds the injectable contraceptive, subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press). Subcutaneous DMPA is a lower-dose, all-in-one injectable contraceptive that is administered every three months under the skin into the fat rather than into the muscle. © 2016 PATH/Gabe Bienczycki, Courtesy of Photoshare

    In Senegal, the modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR) doubled within a decade, rising from 10% in 2005 to 21.2% in 2015. This increase has placed Senegal at the forefront of the international family planning movement.

    The country has adopted a vision for family planning based on what’s knowns as the three Ds—democratization, decentralization, and demedicalization—and has set a very ambitious goal to reach 45% mCPR by 2020.

    One of the guiding principles of Senegal’s Ministry of Health and Social Action (MOHSA) is to ensure the availability of a wide range of contraceptive methods at all levels of health service. This involves introducing as many new high-quality contraceptive products as possible both in public health facilities and at the community level.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Hawa Talla

    IntraHealth International | Deputy Chief of Party, Senegal
    Un prestataire de soins au dispensaire au Sénégal tient le contraceptif injectable DMPA en sous-cutané

    Un prestataire de soins au dispensaire au Sénégal tient le contraceptif injectable DMPA en sous-cutané (DMPA-SC, de la marque Sayana® Press). Le DMPA sous-cutané est un contraceptif injectable à petite dose qu’on administre tous les trois mois sous la peau dans la graisse plutôt que le muscle. © 2016 PATH/Gabe Bienczycki, avec l'aimable autorisation de Photoshare

    De 2005 à 2015 au Sénégal, le taux de prévalence contraceptive est passé de 10% (EDS 2005) à 21,2% (FP2020). Une véritable révolution qui a placé le Senegal au-devant de la scène internationale.

    Le pays a adopté une vision pour la Planification Familiale : les 3 D (Démocratisation – Décentralisation - Démédicalisation) et s’est fixé un objectif ambitieux d’atteindre un taux de prévalence de 45% en 2020. Un bien grand défi !

    L’un des principes directeurs du Ministère de la santé et de l’Action Sociale est de garantir la disponibilité d’une gamme variée de méthodes contraceptives a tous les niveaux. Cela implique des efforts pour élargir la gamme disponible de méthodes contraceptives en introduisant autant que possible de nouveaux produits contraceptifs à la fois dans les points de prestations du public et au niveau communautaire.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Nora Miller

    WCG | Associate Technical Advisor

    Ashley Jackson

    PSI | EECO Project Deputy Director
    happy Woman's Condom couple

    The EECO team hopes that targeted marketing and education will lead to an increased interest in female condom products, and thus more protected sex. Photo: PSI

    Imagine a woman named Cynthia who lives in Malawi.

    Cynthia’s boyfriend Ben doesn’t like to use condoms. And she doesn’t feel like she can insist on condom use. At 20 years old, Cynthia dreams of finishing her studies before having kids. She doesn’t want to get pregnant right now, or risk contracting HIV. Without the use of condoms, Cynthia feels she has few options.

    Cynthia is an archetype, a fictional character typical of a broader group. Globally, there are many women like Cynthia who lack negotiating power within their relationship to insist on condom use. Women account for just over half of the 37 million people worldwide who are living with HIV or AIDS1. In sub-Saharan Africa, the rate of new infection disproportionately affects women, with the highest burden among young women ages 15-242. Condoms are a well-known method of preventing both sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy, but for many women, this isn’t an option. Due to this gender-based inequality, there is a dire need for methods that are woman-initiated.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Deb Levine, BSW, MA

    Male Contraception Initiative | Interim Executive Director
    Men in the Kasana Market in Luwero, Uganda.

    Men in the Kasana Market in Luwero, Uganda. © 2016 David Alexander, Courtesy of Photoshare

    The idea of male contraception has been around for 60 years. Gregory Pincus, the co-inventor of the female contraceptive pill, tested the same hormonal approach on men in 1957, and various hormonal and non-hormonal methods have been explored since. Based on side effects and other research complications, there are still only two reliable, non-hormonal contraceptives on the market for men today: condoms and vasectomy.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Laneta Dorflinger, PhD

    FHI 360 | Distinguished Scientist and Director, Contraceptive Technology Innovation
    As contraceptive product developers, we should support development of contraceptive options that rapidly and reliably eliminate bleeding to offer women a liberating choice.

    As contraceptive product developers, we should support development of contraceptive options that rapidly and reliably eliminate bleeding to offer women a liberating choice.

    This piece was originally published by the CTI Exchange blog, Exchanges.

    Menarche—the onset of menstruation—is a rite of passage for young girls everywhere. In many cultures, this milestone of womanhood comes with celebrations steeped in tradition. But following the ritual comes the reality of having to manage this aspect of being female for 40 or more years.

    Worldwide, women refer to menstruation in various ways, reflecting their many attitudes toward it. Where I grew up in northeastern Pennsylvania, my family and friends called it the “curse” (in my opinion, for good reason). And, as much as many women dread “Aunt Flo’s” monthly visit, they have come to rely on their “friend” as a confirmation they are not pregnant. Others see it as affirmation of womanhood or view it as a natural and necessary means of cleansing to remove accumulated blood.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Vera Halpern, MD

    FHI 360 | Director, Medical Research, Clinical Research Portfolio on Injectables, Contraceptive Technology Innovation
    Flip chart posters used to train community health workers in Uganda illustrate the difference between subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC or brand name Sayana® Press) and intramuscular DMPA (DMPA-IM or brand name Depo-Provera®).

    Flip chart posters used to train community health workers in Uganda illustrate the difference between subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC or brand name Sayana® Press) and intramuscular DMPA (DMPA-IM or brand name Depo-Provera®). Sayana Press and Depo-Provera are registered trademarks of Pfizer Inc. Uniject is a trademark of BD. © 2014 PATH/Will Boase, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Injectable contraceptives are used by more than 50 million women globally. In much of sub-Saharan Africa, they are the most commonly used family planning method. The most popular version, Depo-Provera (depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, or DMPA), is administered intramuscularly (IM) or subcutaneously (SC) every three months. The SC form is marketed globally as Sayana® or Sayana® Press.

    Injectable contraceptives appeal to many women because of their relatively long duration of action (one to three months depending on formulation), high effectiveness (>94%), and ease and discreet nature of administration.

    So what’s a well-established family planning method doing in a blog series about contraceptive technology innovation?