September 2018

  • Integrating Family Planning and Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Services

    This piece was originally published by the Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP).

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child.

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child. (Photo courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCSP.)

    Morondava, Madagascar—At home and in active labor with her third child, 24-year-old Intocelliah was scared. Her previous births had progressed quickly and naturally, but—after a long day of discomfort—this labor seemed stalled.

    In the neighborhood of Sanfily, where she lives, most women give birth at home with the help of family or a traditional birth attendant. But after hours and little progress, Intocelliah feared complications and danger for both her and her baby, and asked to go to the hospital.

  • Kate Consavage

    USAID | Nutrition Communications and Knowledge Management Advisor, Global Health Bureau
    New mothers are counseled on proper breastfeeding and nutrition practices by a peer mother during a women’s support group in the Rukiga district of southwest Uganda.

    New mothers are counseled on proper breastfeeding and nutrition practices by a peer mother during a women’s support group in the Rukiga district of southwest Uganda. Photo: Kate Consavage/USAID

    With one in three people affected by inadequate nutrition, the social, economic, and health consequences of malnutrition are tremendous. Adequate nutrition plays an important role in well-being at all life stages, but the 1,000-day window from a woman’s pregnancy through her child’s second birthday offers a unique opportunity to ensure a child’s proper growth and development for a more prosperous and healthy future. Both the causes and consequences of malnutrition are multi-faceted; therefore, tackling this vast burden requires multi-sectoral coordination and action. Guided by its Multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy, USAID’s nutrition efforts address both the direct and underlying causes of malnutrition, fostering healthier, more productive individuals and families and more stable and resilient societies.