April 2018

  • mHealth

    Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    Tamunotonye Harry is a Nigerian-based digital health advocate who has completed several courses through K4Health’s Global Health eLearning platform.

    Tamunotonye Harry is a Nigerian-based digital health advocate who has completed several courses through K4Health’s Global Health eLearning platform. Photo Credit: Carrot Photography.

    Tamunotonye Harry is a young digital health professional based in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. After learning about the Global Health eLearning Center (GHeL) and taking a course on digital health, Tamunotonye connected with K4Health for information about our Global Digital Health Network. In this lightly edited interview, Tamunotonye explains how discovering GHeL has influenced his career path in a positive way.

    How did your experience in the National Youth Service Corps engage you in mHealth work?

    Tamunotonye Harry: I graduated from the University of Port Harcourt with a degree in Human Physiology in 2015. I had to wait a whole year before I was finally accepted into the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC). The one-year gap was actually a blessing as I used this time to gain work and volunteer experience, which involved building capacity for children with disabilities.

  • Contraceptive Technology Innovation

    Martha Brady

    PATH | Director of Reproductive Health

    Maggie Kilbourne-Brook

    PATH | Senior Program Officer

    This piece originally appeared on the Initiative for Multipurpose Prevention Technologies (IMPT)'s blog.

    Incorporating what women want into new sexual and reproductive health products is essential

    Incorporating what women want into new sexual and reproductive health products is essential. Photo: PATH/Will Boase

    We at PATH make it our business to reflect on the elusive topic of "what women want"—in terms of protection options in their sexual and reproductive lives. Not surprisingly, the answer is complex. Women want and need different things at different stages of their lifecycle, depending on the circumstances of their lives.

    For decades, PATH has worked closely with women and girls in low-resource settings, as well as with diverse partner organizations, to develop, introduce, and scale up innovative technologies that improve women’s health. Our efforts include a strong focus on advancing women’s reproductive health literacy and decision-making autonomy not only as fundamental rights, but also as key building blocks to product uptake and effective use.

  • Family Planning Workforce

    Amy Dempsey, MA

    Population Council | Knowledge Translation and Advocacy Manager, Maternal and Newborn Health
    Shahana Begum talks on a mobile phone with a Health Care Center to refer a pregnant mother to the clinic in Mymensingh, Bangladesh.

    Shahana Begum talks on a mobile phone with a Health Care Center to refer a pregnant mother to the clinic in Mymensingh, Bangladesh. © 2010 Sumon Yusuf, Courtesy of Photoshare

    This piece was originally published on Medium.

    Most evidence shows access to quality maternal health services — even the most basic services — requires many personal sacrifices for women and girls around the world, especially in poor or remote communities where there may not be doctors or primary health facilities.