January 2017

  • Leigh Wynne, MPH

    FHI 360 | Senior Technical Officer, Research Utilization

    Lucy Harber

    FHI 360 | Instructional Design Associate, Research Utilization

    Hannah Hodge

    FHI 360 | Intern, Research Utilization
    A community health worker counsels her client on family planning issues under a tree in rural Uganda.

    A community health worker counsels her client on family planning issues under a tree in rural Uganda. Credit: Morrisa Malkin, FHI 360

    Community-based family planning (CBFP) is a safe and effective way to increase access to vital family planning (FP) services for people across the world. The global shortage of health care workers leaves many women with an unmet need for FP. Employing CBFP approaches helps reach the women who are most vulnerable to unintended pregnancy by bringing sexual and reproductive health services to them. FP2020’s goals include reaching an additional 120 million women by the year 2020—a goal that is attainable in large part because of CBFP practices, with their high efficacy in reaching more women and delivering effective services, safely—particularly to women in rural and underserved communities.

  • Elizabeth Futrell

    CCP | Content Development Lead
    With no dock in Usisya, Malawi, workers load lifesaving health commodities onto a small boat to transport them from the large boat to the mainland.

    With no dock in Usisya, Malawi, workers load lifesaving health commodities onto a small boat to transport them from the large boat to the mainland. © 2012 USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Imagine a health system in which low-income clients can access free contraceptive products and services, those with slightly more financial means can access partially subsidized products and services, and those with the most robust ability to pay can purchase products and services from the commercial sector. Countries implementing a total market approach to family planning strive to make this a reality by using all available public, nonprofit, and private commercial sector resources and infrastructure to improve sustainable access to family planning services for all clients.

  • Amy Lee

    CCP | Program Specialist
    Amino LARC data

    Who uses long-acting birth control? Via Amino.

    In the world of international development, data visualization is in the spotlight—but is it stealing the show from other content adaptation approaches?

    Data visualizations are undeniably powerful. They can clearly convey a complex story to a particular audience, and when done correctly, can serve as a call to action.

  • David Potenziani

    IntraHealth International | Senior Informatics Advisor
    Tinkertoys

    Tinkertoys. Photo by Peter Miller (via Flickr); Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic license (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

    The 2016 Global Digital Health Forum offered a variety of sessions and formats. From simultaneous interactive workshops, panel presentations and fireside chats, one of the challenges for me was that I found all of the content so compelling, I had a hard time prioritizing sessions. One cannot be everywhere—although Co-Chairs Amanda BenDor and Heidi Good Boncana tried to be—and any one person’s observations are really anecdotal. Well, here are my anecdotes.

  • Jarret Cassaniti

    CCP | Program Officer
    Global Digital Health Forum panelists: Sam Wambugu, Mark Cardwell, Siobhan Green, Melissa Sabatier.

    Global Digital Health Forum panelists: Sam Wambugu, Mark Cardwell, Siobhan Green, Melissa Sabatier. Photo: Jarret Cassaniti, 2016

    Data is a powerful tool that can help managers improve health care delivery to the people they serve. During the two days I spent at the Global Digital Health Forum, big data was referenced and audience-first approaches were frequently discussed. Data visualizations were also mentioned as an effective way to deliver meaningful messages. And, they can be as simple as developing a pie chart or table.

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