May 2016

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Carla Visser

    Management Sciences for Health (South Africa) | Team Lead, Special Programs
    Carla Visser and Willow Gerber enjoy an evening in Arusha.

    Carla Visser and Willow Gerber enjoy an evening in Arusha.

    Visiting Tanzania is a privilege—and more so when it is to participate in an event focusing on one of my passions: knowledge management. The East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community Knowledge Management (KM) Share Fair took place April 13-14, 2016 in Arusha with the theme of “peer-to-peer sharing.” There I had the opportunity to connect with fellow knowledge management professionals from 14 countries and territories and learn about approaches and innovations from the region. With panel discussions, knowledge cafés, group activities and social events, the structure of the meeting truly complemented its theme.

  • Esther Pak

    Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health | Communications Specialist, PMA2020
    PMA2020 data informs where development efforts should be targeted

    PMA2020 data informs where development efforts should be targeted, including poverty reduction, health care access for all (especially girls and women), and improved access to water and sanitation sources. Photo: PMA2020

    On May 16-19, 2016, Performance Monitoring and Accountability 2020, a mobile technology-based population survey project based within The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will join global health leaders, advocates, researchers, policy makers, and others at the fourth Women Deliver conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women Deliver is one of the first global conferences since the launch of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), or Global Goals, last September. The theme at this year’s conference is the SDGs and specifically, the implementation of these Global Goals, with a focus on health—in particular, maternal, sexual, and reproductive health and rights.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Stella Kagwiria Muthuri, PhD

    African Population and Health Research Center | Post-Doctoral Fellow
    PhotoVoice gives participants an opportunity to capture the conditions around them, reflect on these conditions or their experiences, and develop strategies to reach policymakers. Photo: APHRC/GrOW Team

    PhotoVoice gives participants an opportunity to capture the conditions around them, reflect on these conditions or their experiences, and develop strategies to reach policy makers. Photo: APHRC/GrOW Team

    I was invited to participate in the Knowledge Management for Health Share Fair held in Arusha, Tanzania between April 13th and 15th. The share fair was well attended, with representatives from 14 countries, allowing for engaging conversations about various knowledge management tools and techniques that may revolutionize the health sector and how information is shared.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Courtney Calvin

    USAID LEARN | Knowledge Management Specialist

    This post originally appeared on the USAID Learning Lab blog, Lab Notes.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    The K4Health Knowledge Management Share Fair in Arusha, Tanzania brought together over 80 knowledge managers in the public health sector from Sub-Saharan Africa to catalyze a knowledge-sharing community and raise awareness of the role of knowledge management (KM) in international development. More than a typical conference, the Share Fair was an opportunity for international development practitioners representing ministries of health, intergovernmental agencies, and USAID implementing partners to interact and learn how to incorporate KM into their processes together.

  • Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives

    Kim Martin

    Health Communication Capacity Collaborative | Communications Director

    This post originally appeared on the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) blog.

    HC3 LARCs video

    A short animated video features Maria, a health care provider at a community clinic.

    Most sexually active adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa are not using modern methods of contraception. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs) are highly effective, convenient and cost-effective, their uptake among young women is low.