November 2015

  • mHealth

    Amanda BenDor

    PATH | Technical Program Manager

    This blog post originally appeared on IntraHealth's blog Vital.

    On Saturday, November 7, the World Health Organization declared Sierra Leone Ebola-free. Hundreds flooded the streets of Freetown to celebrate and pay tribute to those whose lives were lost during the outbreak. I read about the celebrations online with joy and happiness—they’d finally made it. I could almost hear the drums playing from North Carolina.

    Over the past year during my travels to Freetown, I’ve observed the struggles and hardships Ebola has caused for Sierra Leoneans. Minor inconveniences such as curfews and routine traffic stops are coupled with grief over lost family members and constant fear of infection.

  • Linking Family Planning and Global Development

    Rachel Marcus

    USAID | Public Health Adviser, Office of Population and Reproductive Health

    Ellen Starbird

    USAID | Director, Office of Population and Reproductive Health

    Maureen Norton

    USAID | Senior Technical Adviser, Office of Population and Reproductive Health
    © 2014 Haydee Lemus/PASMO PSI Guatemala, Courtesy of Photoshare

    A mother from a rural community in Quiché, Guatemala, tells the story of how family planning and spacing more than three years among each child benefited her as a woman and mother. 

    USAID has supported family planning programs since 1965. As we move toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the post-2015 development agenda, commitment to family planning must remain a key element of the global agenda.

    Voluntary family planning advances the right of all women to decide freely, and for themselves, whether, when, and how many children they want to have. Yet in 2014, estimates indicated that 225 million women in low- and middle-income countries had an unmet need for a modern contraceptive method, meaning they want to stop or delay childbearing but are not using modern contraceptive methods.

  • Mohan P. Joshi

    MSH/SIAPS | Principal Technical Advisor and Cluster Lead for Pharmaceutical Services
    Combat Drug Resistance - WHO

    "No action today, no cure tomorrow." World Health Day, 7 April 2011.

    Picture a scenario where infections become totally untreatable because none of the available antimicrobial agents work.

    This is not imaginary, but is likely to happen very soon if we don’t act urgently, intensely, and consistently to tackle the rising tide of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The World Health Organization (WHO) has labeled AMR as one of the biggest global public health threats. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant hospital infections are revealing examples of such a looming crisis. A recent report highlights the catastrophic consequences AMR will have wrought by the year 2050 if we don’t act now to contain it—about 10 million deaths a year and a cumulative cost of $100 trillion.

  • K4Health Highlights

    Simone Parrish

    CCP | Global Repository Director

    On November 5, the Steering Committee of the International Conference on Family Planning announced the difficult decision to postpone the conference. A nearby volcano has disrupted air travel and created potential health hazards at the conference site. No new date or location has been announced yet. But as Melinda Gates says, not even a volcano can stop the conversation about family planning.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Tara Sullivan

    CCP | Director

    Sara Mazursky

    CCP | Deputy Director

    The International Conference on Family Planning was postponed to January 25-28, 2016. Please view an updated post for a list of K4Health's activities.

    Endang, a 43-year-old midwife from Demak City Government, provides family planning education at a neighborhood health center in Pojok Village, Jragung Subdistrict of Demak City, Central Java, Indonesia. © 2014 Aji Styawan, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Endang, a 43-year-old midwife from Demak City Government, provides family planning education at a neighborhood health center in Pojok Village, Jragung Subdistrict of Demak City, Central Java, Indonesia. © 2014 Aji Styawan, Courtesy of Photoshare

    In a few short days, the 2015 International Conference on Family Planning will draw nearly 3,000 delegates to Nusa Dua, Indonesia, focusing on this year’s theme: “Global Commitments, Local Actions.” To us, this gathering of family planning donors, implementers, program managers, government officials, and others to coordinate, collaborate, share data, and exchange lessons learned, is essentially a large knowledge exchange event!

    So what excites us the most about ICFP this year?

    Global commitments

    FP2020’s latest progress report will be released at the conference. We are excited to learn about country-level progress towards family planning commitments and are proud to have contributed to these global commitments. We are pleased to have partnered with FP2020 and others on the Costed Implementation Plan (CIP) Resource Kit, which helps countries strengthen investments and evaluate their progress. We also work to widely disseminate high-impact practices (HIPs) briefs so programs can have access to practices proven to have a maximum impact on family planning outcomes.