• Kimberly Whipkey

    PATH | Policy and Advocacy Officer

    Chloe Morozoff

    PATH | Program Associate, Reproductive Health
    New family planning products give advocates something to be excited about.

    New family planning products give advocates something to be excited about. Photo: PATH/Gabe Bienczycki

    It’s an interesting time to be a family planning advocate. In many FP2020 countries, we’re making real strides in increasing access to contraception—due in part to the emergence of new methods, from novel female condoms, to implants, to injectables. Maintaining and advancing funding commitments and supportive policies will be even more important as we work to continue hard-won progress.

  • Brian Mutebi

    Education & Development Opportunity – Uganda | Founder & Executive Director
    Congolese refugee women in Rwamwanja, Uganda. © EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi, 2017

    Congolese refugee women in Rwamwanja, Uganda. © EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi, 2017

    Girls and women faced a horrendous situation in Rwamwanja Refugee Settlement in western Uganda. I had only two choices to react to their poignant situation: Weep with them and we all become miserable, or take up their case and work to see something done.

  • Beth Schlachter

    FP2020 | Executive Director

    Chonghee Choi Hwang

    FP2020 | Manager, Asia, Country Support

    This piece originally appeared on FP2020's Medium publication.

    Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) is, at heart, a community of practice: a working partnership where government officials, donors, civil society representatives, and technical experts can roll up their sleeves and figure out how to strengthen and expand high-quality family planning programs. At our second Asia Regional Focal Point Workshop in Manila on May 8-10, we had the incredible privilege of witnessing this powerful process in action. Our work together is more relevant than ever given the challenges our community continues to face, as exemplified by the U.S. government’s budget proposal to cut all funding for international family planning as well as release of implementation guidance on the reinstated and expanded Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance policy, formerly known as the Mexico City policy.

  • Desmond Nji Atanga

    Deserve Cameroon | Founder/CEO
    Desmond Nji Atanga answers students' questions on family planning methods.

    Desmond Nji Atanga answers students' questions on family planning methods.

    Education opens up a wealth of choices and informed decisions necessary to live a healthy life. We know that education and health enjoy positively correlated benefits. Education improves health, while health facilitates successful education. One way of ensuring adequate access to family planning services is through information—and education certainly provides opportunities for that.

  • Sara Stratton, MPH

    Palladium | Senior Technical Advisor, Family Planning, Health, and Health Policy Plus
    A woman with her 11th child in Niger, the country with the highest total fertility rate in the world.

    A woman with her 11th child in Niger, the country with the highest total fertility rate in the world. © 2013 Alison Heller/Washington University in Saint Louis, Courtesy of Photoshare

    This piece was originally published on the Health Policy Plus blog, Viewpoints.

    Earlier this year I traveled to Niger to support the Ministry of Health in refining the country's Costed Implementation Plan (CIP) for family planning. While there, I worked with a dedicated group—ministry staff, implementing partners, representatives from the religious community, and youth advocates—to agree on priorities that could accelerate progress on Niger's ambitious goal to increase its modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR) from 13 percent (or 14.4% for married women) to 50 percent by 2020. We spent 3.5 days combing through the results of their mid-term review of Niger's CIP to set priorities and identify which population groups, in addition to women, we should focus on reaching: youth (what age range?), men (which men: community leaders? partners?), religious leaders? At the end of the workshop, we felt a sense of accomplishment in our priorities going forward, which included establishing how the government can extend services throughout the large Sahelian country using community health workers, mobile clinics, and strategies to improve data collection. Another important priority we agreed on was a focus on educating youth on the socioeconomic benefits of family planning.

  • Nellie Mitchell

    PAI | International Advocacy Associate

    Chiugo Nwangwu

    Marie Stopes Nigeria | Project Manager
    Health workers in Nigeria

    With a dearth of health care providers, CHEWs are critical to reaching women in mostly rural, hard-to-reach areas. Photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons by Direct Relief.

    This post was originally published by Advance Family Planning.

    On April 28, 2017, the Nigerian Minister of Health released an updated training curriculum for Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs) to include guidance on providing long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs). The revision builds on Nigeria’s 2014 task-sharing policy that authorizes CHEWs to provide women with implants and intra-uterine devices, both LARC methods.

  • Jay Gribble

    Palladium | Deputy Director, Family Planning/Reproductive Health, Health Policy Plus
    A mother and daughter embrace at Camp Langano, Ethiopia. Photo by Sean Sheridan.

    A mother and daughter embrace at Camp Langano, Ethiopia. Photo by Sean Sheridan.

    This piece was originally published on the Huffington Post and on the Health Policy Plus blog, Viewpoints.

    Over the past decade, rates of infant, child, and maternal deaths have decreased significantly. The efforts to reach the underserved are really making a difference and have resulted in big improvements. But with more than 300,000 women dying from pregnancy-related causes each year, we still have a long way to go. While there are many ways to save lives, one of the simplest and most cost-effective is contraception.

  • Jarret Cassaniti

    CCP | Program Officer
    Cover of the M&E Guide published in 2007

    M&E Guide (2007)

    K4Health and the Global Health Knowledge Collaborative share five ways organizations have measured knowledge management activities based on a monitoring and evaluation guide.

    Before we were known as K4Health, USAID’s flagship knowledge management project, led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, was the INFO Project. It was almost 10 years ago, in November 2007, that INFO Project staff published the Guide to Monitoring and Evaluating Health Information Products and Services. The Guide was developed in collaboration with HIPNet (the Health Information and Publications Network), and featured a rudimentary logic model and 29 indicators.

  • Anne Kott

    CCP | Communications Director
    Climate-affected internally displaced persons board a boat to travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Climate-affected internally displaced persons board a boat to travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh. © 2014 M Ponir Hossain, Courtesy of Photoshare

    We live in a connected world. The rise in mobile device ownership, internet coverage, and wireless access means that we can reach each other from nearly anywhere, at any time. Yet technology is far from the only thing that connects us. There are a number of complex connections between our families, our health, and the environment that impact our lives. Recognizing these interactions, development practitioners have established a term to describe programming approaches that concurrently address issues related to families, their health, and the environment. This approach is called Population, Health and Environment (PHE).

  • Annah Sango

    African Young Positives Network | Advocacy Manager
    Annah Sango

    "I need to allow myself to be led in order to lead effectively."

    Annah Sango is a Women Deliver Young Leader from Zimbabwe. She is a passionate advocate for youth health and well-being, encouraging her peers to learn about their sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially concerning HIV/AIDS. Here, she shares her reflections on what advocacy means to her.

    My advocacy experiences have been and still are a learning process. I have interacted with mentors and whole groups of people who have demonstrated amazing skills and work. Along the way, I have learnt that advocacy is a journey that happens on different levels. As a young woman, I should not merely occupy spaces without validating my relevance and representation of what I stand for. Sometimes making noise is not activism—and sometimes, making the necessary noise is.

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