mHealth

  • Blog post
    Panelists at the mHealth Forum’s closing plenary discuss how to empower women through digital technology.

    Panelists at the mHealth Forum’s closing plenary discuss how to empower women through digital technology.

    It’s not every day that you hear about a way to grow the global economy by $13 to $18 billion. What’s the magic bullet? Building women’s digital skills. Alice Borrelli, Director of Global Health and Workforce Policy at Intel Corporation, shared statistics from Intel’s 2013 report, Women and the Web, showing that almost 25% fewer women are online than men in low- and middle-income countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, the gap is 43%.

  • Blog post
    Uju Ofomata-Aderemi of OneWorld UK presents the Ma3looma project at the Global mHealth Forum.

    Uju Ofomata-Aderemi of OneWorld UK presents the Ma3looma project at the Global mHealth Forum.

    User-centered design is currently one of the most popular buzzwords in the field of information and communication technology for development (ICT4D). It is the first of the Principles for Digital Development, it can be found in most proposals and concept notes today, and it was the focus of sessions, presentations, and countless comments at the Global mHealth Forum held last month in Washington, D.C.

  • Blog post
    Panelists discuss keeping mobile data safe at the Global mHealth Forum.

    Panelists discuss keeping mobile data safe at the Global mHealth Forum.

    The Potential of Electronic Health Records

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to improve many aspects of health care delivery in resource-poor settings, from averting dangerous drug interactions to providing additional layers of security; from removing the problems related to illegible handwriting to ensuring that the data collected is complete. But there are many important considerations that must accompany the decision to switch to an EHR system. At the Keeping Mobile Data Safe: Privacy & Security Issues in Global mHealth session during the Global mHealth Forum in Washington, D.C. on November 10th, the panelists did an excellent job at addressing security concerns.

  • Blog post
    An ASHA counsels a woman in Bihar, India. Photo courtesy of Sanjanthi Velu.

    An ASHA counsels a woman in Bihar, India. Photo courtesy of Sanjanthi Velu.

    I attended the Global mHealth Forum and mHealth Summit in November, just outside of Washington D.C. Being somewhat new to mHealth, the Forum gave me the opportunity to see the various ways mHealth can propel the world of global health and serve as a unique tool to expand access, improve health promotion, strengthen service delivery, and change behaviors around the globe.

  • Blog post
    Participants engage in discussion during a session at the Global mHealth Forum.

    Participants engage in discussion during a session at the Global mHealth Forum.

    We currently live in a period where data can translate into improved outcomes for many people. Through the use of technology in the health sector, digital solutions have helped empower health care workers and their clients to improve their work and lives.

  • Blog post
    mHealthknowledge.org is K4Heath’s curated collection of key resources for the digital health community.

    mHealthknowledge.org is K4Heath’s curated collection of key resources for the digital health community.

    After a rich two days attending the Global mHealth Forum in November, my mind is full, and my professional focus is rededicated to understanding, sourcing, sharing, and implementing appropriate digital solutions to improve access to health and information. Working for the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project, I tend to think in terms of knowledge management for mHealth: sharing information to help others find digital health resources and information to use in reaching their objectives.

    The Global mHealth Forum connected global health and development practitioners working in low- and middle-income countries to people, products and ideas. Hundreds of experts, students, technologists, health strategists, donors, and medical professionals convened to share lessons learned, implementation challenges, ideas for integration and scale-up, and more.

  • Blog post
    Photo courtesy of Norbert Boruett

    IVR allows more information to be communicated than a standard text message on a basic phone. Photo courtesy of Norbert Boruett.

    This post originally appeared on IntraHealth's Tumblr, Picture It.

    A student at the Kenya Medical Training College Kitui receives a text for a refresher course on family planning she’s taking through the K4Health project.

    The course combines mobile phone and interactive voice response (IVR) technology to deliver up to 20 questions with accompanying explanations to health professional students and health workers—entirely on their mobile phones. They all previously completed courses online at the USAID-supported Global Health eLearning Center.

    Whenever she’s ready, the student can listen to the day’s questions and type back her answers. She’ll receive audio feedback right away and once she’s answered all the questions correctly twice in a row, she’ll complete the course.

  • Blog post

    This blog post originally appeared on IntraHealth's blog Vital.

    On Saturday, November 7, the World Health Organization declared Sierra Leone Ebola-free. Hundreds flooded the streets of Freetown to celebrate and pay tribute to those whose lives were lost during the outbreak. I read about the celebrations online with joy and happiness—they’d finally made it. I could almost hear the drums playing from North Carolina.

    Over the past year during my travels to Freetown, I’ve observed the struggles and hardships Ebola has caused for Sierra Leoneans. Minor inconveniences such as curfews and routine traffic stops are coupled with grief over lost family members and constant fear of infection.

  • Blog post
    A pregnant woman's mother-in-law watches as a community health worker uses an interactive audio/visual mobile phone-based health application to counsel the woman at her home in the Bahraich District, India. © 2013 DS Panwar/India, Courtesy of Photoshare

    A pregnant woman's mother-in-law watches as a community health worker uses an interactive audio/visual mobile phone-based health application to counsel the woman at her home in the Bahraich District, India. © 2013 DS Panwar/India, Courtesy of Photoshare

    The mHealth Working Group, facilitated and supported by USAID's Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project, is gearing up to host the second annual Global mHealth Forum, November 10-11. The Forum will be held in partnership with the HIMSS Connected Health Conference and the mHealth Summit, November 8-11, at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center near Washington, D.C.

    Here are just a few reasons to join us at the Forum:

    • Build your capacity to design, implement, and evaluate mHealth initiatives.
    • Explore emerging mHealth trends in low- and middle-income countries.
    • Discuss strategies to leverage mHealth in low- and middle-income countries.
    • Network with mHealth professionals and representatives from NGOs and ministries of health.

  • Blog post
    A meeting at the Senegal Ministry of Health and Social Action.

    A meeting at the Senegal Ministry of Health and Social Action. Photo by David Potenziani.

    This blog post originally appeared on IntraHealth's blog Vital.

    During my first trip to Senegal, I was there to accomplish something that at first sounded simple: help the Senegalese government create a national eHealth plan.

    They wanted to develop a strategic plan to organize all electronic and mobile health efforts in the country. The idea was to guide and leverage the various efforts in a coherent process.

    But once I arrived and began talking to people, the complexity of the planning process began to seep in (along with the heat, as Senegal was in the summer rainy season).

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