Linking Family Planning and Global Development

  • Blog post
    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia.

    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Photo by Daniel Adero.

    This piece originally appeared on CCP's blog.

    The concept is simpler than the name suggests: To improve communities and the livelihoods of their people.

    The approach is called Population, Health and Environment, PHE for short. PHE programs are specifically designed to promote modern family planning, encourage environmental conservation and improve health outcomes by creating a package of interventions such as pairing education about dwindling fisheries with education around contraception and malaria prevention.

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    A family planning clinic in Burkina Faso.

    A family planning clinic in Burkina Faso. Photo: Trevor Snapp.

    This post originally appeared on IntraHealth's blog, VITAL.

    By 2100, the world’s population will rise to 11 billion. But that doesn’t mean family planning investments aren’t working.

    “So, you just find articles on healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies, you don’t read them, huh?”

  • Blog post
    David Johnson at the PHE Symposium

    David presented on the Margaret Pyke Trust’s PHE advocacy and its focus on engaging new audiences.

    For two days in September 2017, Population, Health, & Environment (PHE) project implementers, policymakers, and donors gathered in Entebbe, Uganda, at the Population, Health, & Environment Symposium, hosted by the Lake Victoria Basin Commission and supported by USAID Kenya and East Africa, K4Health, and PACE. David Johnson, chief executive of the Margaret Pyke Trust, the UK NGO coordinating the Population & Sustainability Network, shares some thoughts on the Symposium. David’s PHE advocacy focuses on what he calls “new audiences.” In practice, this means working to increase the number of organisations involved and support (either from a policy or programmatic point of view) to make PHE seen as completely normal standard conservation intervention. According to David, PHE is exclusively positive—it benefits women, girls, livelihoods, and the environment—and positioning it in a more positive way might help engage organisations more.

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    Delegates at the closing ceremony of the Regional PHE Symposium 2017

    Delegates at the closing ceremony of the Regional PHE Symposium 2017. Photo: Favour Studios Kampala

    Worldwide, Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) is a leading force for addressing and linking issues related to conservation and health. The PHE approach acknowledges and addresses the complex connections between people, their health, and their environment. Today, integrated PHE programming has especially gained momentum in the East Africa Community region and is being applied to concerns as wide-ranging as climate change and food security, especially at the household level.

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    This piece originally appeared on MCSP's blog.

    A mother with her children in Ghana. (Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCSP)

    A mother with her children in Ghana. (Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCSP)

    For millions of women worldwide, lack of economic independence can mean more than a life of poverty. Unable to access healthcare without a husband’s or father’s permission, it can be a matter of life or death.

    Women in many of the countries where USAID’s flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP) works struggle to take control of their lives – both financially and physically. This includes their ability to choose when and if to have another pregnancy. Often there’s a relationship between these two facts, as well: as our staff found in Nigeria, male control over household assets and decision-making has a direct impact on contraceptive prevalence rate.

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    PHE champions in Bisoro Commune, Burundi at their demonstration site.

    PHE champions in Bisoro Commune, Burundi at their demonstration site.

    On September 27-28, 2017, the Lake Victoria Basin Commission (LVBC), in partnership with USAID/Kenya East Africa, the Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project and Population Reference Bureau (PRB), will host a regional Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) Symposium in Entebbe, Uganda. The theme of the symposium is Enhancing Resiliency and Economic Development through Strengthened PHE Programming.

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    NGOs have established temporary clinics for IDPs in Northeastern Nigeria, but sexual and reproductive health services are still largely inadequate.

    NGOs have established temporary clinics for IDPs in Northeastern Nigeria, but sexual and reproductive health services are still largely inadequate. Photo: Oluyemisi Falope

    When I arrived, the insurgency was still trying to push back, launching attacks and using suicide bombers; the Nigerian army fought back. We could hear and feel bombs and shells going off every now and then. It is not something you get accustomed to: You just say your prayers and hope it is the soldiers warding off the insurgents.

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    K4Health is pleased to share this piece from our colleagues at USAID’s Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP). Family planning is crucial to meeting the Sustainable Development Gals (SDGs), especially those addressing maternal and child heath, yet unmet need is still high in many countries. Postpartum family planning interventions can make an impact by reaching women when they give birth and incorporating family planning into routine postpartum care.

  • Blog post

    This post was originally published by PRB.

    Men fishing off Rusinga Island, Kenya.

    Men fishing off Rusinga Island, Kenya. © Ryan Harvey, 2007. Licensed under Creative Commons: CC BY-SA 4.0

    Integrated approaches to development are gaining traction, especially as the global development community observes the one-year commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which highlight the interrelated relationships between many development sectors. One such integrated approach is known as Population, Health, and Environment (PHE), which seeks to provide voluntary family planning, improve people’s health, and conserve the environment in rural communities in an integrated, multisectoral manner.

  • Blog post

    This post was originally published on the Zika Communication Network.

    Los investigadores no tardaron mucho tiempo en descubrir cuál es la amenaza más grave que presenta el virus del Zika: el mayor riesgo de microcefalia y otros defectos congénitos en bebés nacidos de madres infectadas con el virus del Zika durante el embarazo. Al mismo tiempo, la reacción ante la crisis del Zika ha puesto en evidencia problemas mucho mayores de los sistemas de salud en los países afectados, que incluyen la falta de acceso a la información y a los servicios de anticoncepción integrales en algunas comunidades afectadas o amenazadas por el virus del Zika.

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