Knowledge Management for Global Health

  • Blog post
    We’re doing all this good work: What are we learning and how do we share it?

    Over the course of a global health project, team members learn a lot about what successfully improves health and what doesn’t. Capturing and sharing this knowledge is essential to designing and implementing more effective programs in the future.

  • Blog post
    Tumusiime share fair blog photo

    The East Africa Regional Share Fair attracted participants from many sectors.

    In his book Post-Capitalist Society, prominent management thinker and writer Peter F. Drucker notes, “Knowledge has become the key economic resource and the dominant—and perhaps even the only—source of competitive advantage.”

    How to make this a reality for East Africa informed most of the discussions at the Regional Share Fair conducted in Uganda in June 2018. The objective of the Share Fair was to collaboratively learn how to apply knowledge management (KM) tools, techniques, and approaches in the health sector.

  • Blog post
    Knowledge Management in Practice: Nurturing a Learning Culture

    Nurturing a Learning Culture is the first installment of our three-part webinar series on Knowledge Management in Practice.

    All organizations have some knowledge management (KM) processes and systems, but do you want to make your institution’s processes and systems more effective, purposeful, and systematic? Hear from KM experts about how they have shaped an enabling environment for learning and knowledge management by making the case for KM, strengthening local ownership and capacity, and getting started with clear objectives and tasks.

  • Blog post
    The Share Fair exemplified the EAC's readiness to use knowledge management to ensure better integration and improved health outcomes for all of its citizens.

    The Share Fair exemplified the EAC's readiness to use knowledge management to ensure better integration and improved health outcomes for all of its citizens. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    If you have been engaged in global health work, you should know by now that knowledge management (KM) approaches have taken a central place in program implementation to improve health outcomes. While the practices are not new (in fact, they date back to old times, such as the Industrial Age, when knowledge was focused on machinery and human physical energy), the field has been growing. Knowledge once meant only accessing data and info, then developed into understanding gained from experience, analysis, and sharing. Now, knowledge management is more human centered and focused on around generating, capturing, sharing, and applying learning in order to achieve both customer satisfaction and innovation.

  • Blog post
    Panel discussion on the state of knowledge management integration in reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child, and adolescent health (RMNCAH) and HIV.

    Panel discussion on the state of knowledge management integration in reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child, and adolescent health (RMNCAH) and HIV. Photo: Nemuson Studios.

    Two years ago (2016), I participated in the first East African Community (EAC) Share Fair in Arusha, Tanzania, organized by Knowledge for Health (K4Health). While it was the first, the enthusiasm that accompanied the participation from the member states and implementing partners indicated a path to adoption of knowledge management practices. Fast forward two years, and we were in Uganda to not only take stock, but also determine how individual countries would integrate knowledge management toward better reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child, adolescent health and HIV (RMNCAH & HIV) programming.

  • Blog post
    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair.

    Dr. Mashafi of USAID Boresha Afya – Southern Zone (Tanzania) poses a question to the panelists during the Share Fair. Photo: Nemuson Studios

    The alarm rings at exactly 6:30am on 20 June 2018. It seems like I have only just blinked. A brand new day ushers in the beginning of the EAC Regional Share Fair. I yawn, then I stretch. Then I snooze for a couple more minutes before I get ready. The previous day’s trip to Uganda was quite exhausting. It is unfortunate we still do not have a direct flight to Entebbe from Dar es Salaam. (Private jet from USAID next time?)

  • Blog post
    EAC Share Fair June 2018

    The EAC Regional Share Fair will be held June 20-22 in Entebbe, Uganda. (Click to enlarge.)

    The East African Community (EAC), like most other low- and middle-income regions, is grappling with a myriad of disease burdens ranging from common infections, nutritional challenges, and maternal mortality to non-communicable diseases to epidemics. Article 118 of the Treaty for the Establishment of the EAC calls for stronger regional cooperation on health among the partner states. Realization of this mandate requires effective management of the health sector knowledge resources.

    The dynamic nature of the health sector presents a challenge: synthesis and sharing of knowledge among stakeholders and EAC partner states. Barriers include difficulties accessing information resources from both local and international sources and limited knowledge of and access to knowledge management tools and strategies.

  • Blog post
    Participants enjoy a proverb icebreaker exercise at the start of the Share Fair.

    Participants enjoy a proverb icebreaker exercise at the start of the Share Fair. Photo: Zwade Studio 

    The K4Health Project has hosted a number of share fairs since our initial Global Health Knowledge Management Share Fair, which was held in Washington, D.C., in April 2013. Our guide walking others through the process of hosting a share fair, How to Hold a Successful Share Fair, is even in its second edition. Although I attended our first share fair, I was not closely involved in the planning process. So when I had the opportunity to be part of a small planning team for a share fair being held in the Caribbean region, I was eager to contribute to our growing body of knowledge on planning an effective share fair.

  • Blog post
    KM Indicator Library

    GHKC's KM Indicator Library

    For international development programs to be effective, maximize performance, and be better stewards of resources, they must be able to successfully adapt in response to changes and new information. The ability to do so requires accepting that programmatic change does not usually follow linear and predictable paths, giving way to an environment that promotes learning and to a project design that is flexible. This flexibility minimizes the obstacles to program modifications and creates the space for adaptive management.

  • Blog post
    Building Better Programs Through Knowledge Management 3

    In February 2018, K4Health hosted a webinar to introduce the new Knowledge Management Collection.

    On Thursday February 8, 2018, K4Health co-hosted the webinar, “Building Better Programs Through Knowledge Management” with guest presenters from Pathfinder International and Ipas.

    When health program staff and practitioners can manage and share knowledge effectively, they can deliver better results. Yet many projects and programs don’t have systems in place to share critical knowledge and translate lessons learned, which can result in missed opportunities, duplication, and wasted time and money.

    The Knowledge for Health (K4Health) Project has developed the Knowledge Management Collection, a family of resources designed for global health professionals to help them understand, use, and train others on knowledge management approaches, tools, and techniques. The KM Collection includes practical guides, comprehensive training materials, and a step-by-step framework.

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