K4Health Highlights

  • Blog post
    David Alexander, Liz Futrell, and Sarah Harlan pose for a pre-interview selfie with Dr. Tlaleng Mofokeng, 120 Under 40 winner from South Africa.

    David Alexander, Liz Futrell, and Sarah Harlan pose for a pre-interview selfie with Dr. Tlaleng Mofokeng, 120 Under 40 winner from South Africa. Photo by David Alexander.

    There’s no better way to take the pulse of a movement than to listen to what its youngest leaders have to say. Last week, K4Health and FP2020’s Family Planning Voices initiative did just that in New York City, when we interviewed the 2016 World Contraception Day Ambassadors and several winners of 120 Under 40: The New Generation of Family Planning Leaders about their commitment to expanding awareness of and access to contraception and related services to underserved populations. We spoke with young leaders from Uganda, India, Trinidad & Tobago, Canada, Lesotho, Poland, Vietnam, Egypt, South Africa, Nigeria, the Philippines, Kenya, and the U.S. about the work they’re being recognized for and their priorities for the future. While their countries, backgrounds, disciplines, and programs are diverse, several common threads that highlight the innovation that young people are bringing to the movement emerged from our conversations.

  • Blog post
    FP Voices cover FP2020

    Through FP Voices, K4Health, FP2020, and our partners document and share stories from individuals around the world who are passionate about family planning. Many of you have supported our efforts by participating in an interview and portrait session, visiting the FP Voices installation at global conferences, or reading and sharing FP Voices stories. With your help, we have collected more than 200 stories from more than 40 countries.

  • Blog post

    This post originally appeared on the Zika Communication Network.

    USAID, K4Health, and the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) are pleased to launch the Zika Communication Network (ZCN) —a reliable one-stop shop for Zika prevention and preparedness materials. ZCN curates essential, evidence-based tools and resources to help health and development professionals minimize the spread of Zika and related negative pregnancy outcomes using four key strategies:

  • Blog post
    IUDs are displayed on a table at the counseling unit in Yusuf Dantsoho memorial hospital in Nigeria’s northern city of Kaduna. © 2012 Akintunde Akinleye/NURHI, Courtesy of Photoshare

    IUDs are displayed on a table at the counseling unit in Yusuf Dantsoho memorial hospital in Nigeria’s northern city of Kaduna. © 2012 Akintunde Akinleye/NURHI, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Long-acting reversible contraceptives, or LARCs, are getting a lot of attention these days. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released new guidelines recommending that LARCs be the “first line” of contraceptives for preventing adolescent pregnancy in the U.S. In other words, pediatricians should recommend LARCs such as IUDs and implants before shorter-term contraceptive methods such as condoms and pills for teens. Days later, The New England Journal of Medicine published the impressive results of a study showing that providing adolescent girls in the U.S. with information about, and affordable access to, LARCs can reduce rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion by more than 75%.

  • Blog post

    On November 5, the Steering Committee of the International Conference on Family Planning announced the difficult decision to postpone the conference. A nearby volcano has disrupted air travel and created potential health hazards at the conference site. No new date or location has been announced yet. But as Melinda Gates says, not even a volcano can stop the conversation about family planning.

  • Blog post
    The 5P Approach
    K4Health KM Capacity Assessment Tool: The 5P Approach

    Knowledge management (KM) capacity and organizational culture work together like an engine for initiating, facilitating, and sustaining KM efforts within organizations. However, KM practitioners in global health and development often face challenges in strengthening KM capacity and culture, as they may not be well equipped with a practical tool readily applicable to their specific context and needs.

  • Blog post

    Knowledge management is a simple concept, but it can be hard to articulate. We at K4Health believe that to spark real dialogue about its power and potential, we need to cut through the jargon and focus on the heart of knowledge management: people.

  • Blog post

    Get your own copy (preprint version) of the article today from POPLINE! (The article is formally published in the Journal of Information and Knowledge Management (JIKM). You can access the abstract and the PDF for a fee on the journal website.)  

    I find visual tools such as logic models, theoretical frameworks, program matrices, etc. very useful and effective for my work. These tools communicate a shared vision and explain how our strategies and programmatic components lead to expected outcomes.

  • Blog post

    As a rookie player to the game of mothering, I recently realized I had taken for granted the pleasant labor and delivery unit I experienced with the birth of my first child in October 2013. I was coached, cared for, and, most importantly, respected by all of the labor and delivery unit staff – isn’t that what everyone experiences? Unfortunately, I came to find out that the answer is “no.”

    This spring I had the opportunity to interview Meredith, a Certified Nurse-Midwife who works for Zanmi Lasante, the sister organization of Partners in Health in Haiti. She enlightened me to the fact that not all women have a positive or respectful experience during childbirth. One unfortunate result is that some women, upon hearing about or having a negative experience, choose to deliver at home without a skilled birth attendant. This puts them at risk of childbirth-related complications.

    How did a K4Health Toolkit help Meredith strengthen respectful maternity care in Haiti? Watch our new video to find out!

    If you are like Meredith and have used a Toolkit or a Toolkit resource in your work in an impactful way, I would love to hear your story.

  • Blog post
    Cover of GHSP Volume 3 Issue 2

    From the cover of GHSP: A BlueStar social franchisee provider in Senegal talks with prospective clients about service offerings on opening day. Global franchisors MSI and PSI have rapidly scaled their family planning social franchising programs in recent years. Credit: Nils Elzenga/Marie Stopes International.

    Social franchising “should be pursued vigorously” to reach the FP2020 goal of providing access to modern contraception to 120 million additional clients by 2020, report the editors of Global Health: Science and Practice (GHSP) in the new June 2015 issue.

    Social franchising organizes small, independent health care businesses into quality-assured networks. It leverages the vast resources of private-sector health facilities in low- and middle-income countries to expand access to and quality of services by building facilities’ capacity to deliver important yet underprovided services, such as inserting and removing implants and IUDs.

    Two landmark articles published in the newest issue of GHSP showcase the accomplishments made by Marie Stopes International (MSI) and Population Services International (PSI), two of the largest global franchisor entities. Sarah Thurston and colleagues from MSI and PSI report on their social franchising footprint between 2013 and 2014. In just one year, the total couple-years of protection (CYPs) delivered by the two organizations combined grew by a remarkable 25%—from 8.6 million to 10.8 million. Reporting on detailed results from MSI’s program, Munroe, Hayes, and Taft describe many other positive accomplishments, including reaching a high proportion of young women aged 15–24 and low-income women living on under US$2.50/day. In addition, a very high proportion of MSI social franchising clients (68%) chose to use long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), confirming findings reported by Curry et al. in the previous GHSP issue that LARCs can be delivered successfully in many settings.   

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