Contraceptive Security

  • Blog post

    This post was originally published by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs.

    Halima Shariff, Director, Advance Family Planning Tanzania, Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, leads a panel with donors at the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition reception at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington.

    Halima Shariff, Director, Advance Family Planning Tanzania, Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, leads a panel with donors at the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition reception at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington.

    Last week, along with several other colleagues from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP), I attended the 17th General Membership Meeting of the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition (RHSC) in Seattle, Washington. In addition to collecting interviews for the Family Planning Voices initiative, which we co-lead with Family Planning 2020 (FP2020), we also had the opportunity to think about how communication fits within the complex world of supply chain management.

  • Blog post
    A stock card for oral contraceptives at a health facility in Matola, Mozambique. © 2012 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare

    A stock card for oral contraceptives at a health facility in Matola, Mozambique. © 2012 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare

    In 2015, FP2020 published the first round of country-level data that reported on the stockout indicators developed and tested by members of the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition. Priya Emmart, Senior M&E Specialist for Track20 in the Center for M&E at Avenir Health, leads analysis of the stockout indicators data. I spoke to her to learn how having comparable stockout data will contribute to resolving stockouts, reducing unmet need, and achieving the FP2020 goals.

  • Blog post
    Ellen T. Tompsett

    Ellen T. Tompsett

    In 2015, the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition introduced the Harmonized Suite of Indicators to Measure Stockouts and Availability of Contraceptives. These indicators are the culmination of two years collaboration by Coalition members and partners to define, field test, and refine a series of standardized stockout indicators. Ellen T. Tompsett, Senior Program Officer for Reducing Stockouts, was a leader of the effort on behalf of the Coalition. I interviewed Ellen to learn why these indicators are important.

  • Blog post
    The 5 stages of a contracting lifecycle. Created by Prographics.

    The 5 stages of a contracting lifecycle. Created by Prographics.

    To advance toward universal health coverage, sponsors of health care programs are seeking ways to improve consumer access to quality, affordable health services, including those for family planning.

    Governments, donors, insurance companies, private employers, and other purchasers have long contracted private (not-for-profit, for-profit, and faith-based) providers to deliver health care services. Through contracting, they can increase the number of service delivery points providing priority health services; encourage efficiency and quality in service delivery by instituting clinical and non-clinical standards; and reduce financial barriers for clients such as high out-of-pocket payments at the time of care.

  • Blog post
    Jean Pierre Kandety reviews data forms in one of Don Bosco’s warehouses. Photo courtesy of IntraHealth International

    Jean Pierre Kandety reviews data forms in one of Don Bosco’s warehouses. Photo courtesy of IntraHealth International

    The Informed Push Model—a public-private partnership model ensuring contraceptive security in Senegal—has received a lot of attention in the last few years. IPM, as the model is known, reduces stockouts and is one component of Senegal’s successful progress in family planning over the last few years.

  • Blog post
    Contraceptive stockouts are a barrier to reducing maternal mortality, to addressing unmet need, and to reducing unintended pregnancies. Photo: Valeria Eguche Bianchetti, valeria.eguche@eldirectorio.com.pe.

    Contraceptive stockouts are a barrier to reducing maternal mortality, to addressing unmet need, and to reducing unintended pregnancies.

    At Take Stock, we often start talking about stockouts by asking our colleagues to picture the women affected by a lack of access to the right contraceptives. Imagine: What happens to women when their clinics are stocked out of their contraceptives? What risks do their families now face? We know that resolving contraceptive stockouts will result directly in improved maternal and child health, healthier families, and healthier economies.

  • Blog post
    Dr. Andrew William, JSI/USAID | DELIVER PROJECT

    Dr. Andrew William, JSI/USAID | DELIVER PROJECT

    Too often, knowledge portals take “a build it and they will come” attitude. The thinking goes that by simply dumping enough research and best practices in a single virtual corner, you’ll attract a crowd. This is shortsighted.

    The internet is full of knowledge portals and digital libraries, but we are currently partnering with the Regional Centre of Excellence of Health Supply Chain Management in Kigali, Rwanda, to design something special.

  • Blog post

    Though it is 2016, one-third of the world’s population is still without access to essential life-saving medicines. As we usher in the era of the Sustainable Development Goals, there has never been a more important time to renew our focus on developing the health supply chains in countries with the greatest health needs.

    These health supply chains are the “arteries” of health care, without which the health products needed by health workers could not flow to the patients who need them. Many of these patients are currently dying from illnesses, such as malaria, that are treatable by modern medicine. Many clients are in need of reproductive health commodities to achieve their family planning goals. Many men, women, and children need continuous supply of ARVs for HIV/AIDS treatment. The list goes on.

  • Blog post
    In Santo Tomás Milpas Altas, Guatemala, WINGS Family Planning Educator Evelyn registers women to receive the long-term contraceptive methods of their choice, which were predominantly Jadelle implants.

    In Santo Tomás Milpas Altas, Guatemala, WINGS Family Planning Educator Evelyn registers women to receive the long-term contraceptive methods of their choice, which were predominantly Jadelle implants. © 2015 Anna Zatonow/WINGS Guatemala, Courtesy of Photoshare

    “Ensuring contraceptive supplies are in the system—that's huge. It doesn't matter what you are able to do in a clinic or in a health communication program if the pipeline is not full or ready to be responsive to the demand [for contraceptives].” — Susan Krenn, Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs

    Geography. Weather. Lack of infrastructure. Cultural norms. Family dynamics. Societal expectations. These are all factors that hinder a woman’s ability to access voluntary family planning and other medical services, but that are out of her control. Health systems, donors, development organizations, and other stakeholders have little control over these factors either.