• Advocating for Family Planning Policy

    Kathy Erb

    Christian Connections for International Health (CCIH) | Communications Manager
    Un dirigeant confessionnel démontrant son soutien à la planification familiale lors de l'ICFP 2018.

    Un dirigeant confessionnel démontrant son soutien à la planification familiale lors de l'ICFP 2018. Photo: Kathy Erb

    «Si vos parents avaient eu recours à la planification familiale, vous ne seriez pas ici», a déclaré un responsable gouvernemental à Mme Séraphine Lugwarna Nzigire lorsqu'elle est allée promouvoir les services de planification familiale afin de réduire le taux élevé de décès maternels dans son district en République démocratique du Congo (RDC). Elle n'a pas été dissuadée. Elle lui a dit qu'elle ne partirait pas avant d'avoir expliqué ce qui se passait dans sa communauté pour qu'il comprenne le besoin. Mme Nzigire est membre du Bureau diocésain des œuvres médicales (BDOM), une organisation catholique qui place le bien-être de la population au centre de ses travaux, un trait essentiel pour le succès de la promotion en faveur de la planification familiale de BDOM.

  • Advocating for Family Planning Policy

    Kathy Erb

    Christian Connections for International Health (CCIH) | Communications Manager
    A faith leader demonstrating his support for family planning at ICFP 2018.

    A faith leader demonstrating his support for family planning at ICFP 2018. Photo: Kathy Erb

    “If your parents used family planning you would not be here,” a government official said to Mrs. Séraphine Lugwarna Nzigire when she went to advocate for family planning services to reduce the high rate of maternal deaths in her district in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). She was not deterred. She told him she was not leaving until she explained what was happening in her community so he would understand the need. Mrs. Nzigire is with Bureau Diocesain des Oeuvres Medicale (BDOM), a Catholic organization that puts the wellbeing of the people at the center of its work, a trait that has been crucial to BDOM’s family planning advocacy success.

  • mSTAR Project

    A Project of FHI 360
    mSTAR Project clinic photo

    Stacey Machayo, at OliveLink Healthcare clinic in Sinai (Nairobi) after receiving treatment though M-TIBA for her daughter. Image provided by FHI 360.

    This blog post originally appeared on the website of FHI 360's mSTAR Project.

    Digital financial services provide a way for practitioners to strengthen health programs and improve health outcomes, yet few have recognized their full value. In Kenya, where lack of money prevents two out of five people from seeking treatment, a new digital platform is helping to make healthcare affordable and accessible. Known as M-TIBA, the platform enables users to access health savings accounts and pay for insurance premiums, all at a low cost via the mobile phone. The platform has the potential to offer more in the future, with the M-TIBA team currently working on an emergency loan for medical expenses. More than 1.4 million users have joined M-TIBA, with users and insurance policies growing each day.

  • Anne Kott

    CCP | Communications Director

    Are you planning to attend the 2018 International Conference on Family Planning (ICFP)? We invite you to join K4Health as we work to foster knowledge exchange during the conference.

    Learn about our latest research:

  • Integrating Family Planning and Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Services

    This piece was originally published by the Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP).

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child.

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child. (Photo courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCSP.)

    Morondava, Madagascar—At home and in active labor with her third child, 24-year-old Intocelliah was scared. Her previous births had progressed quickly and naturally, but—after a long day of discomfort—this labor seemed stalled.

    In the neighborhood of Sanfily, where she lives, most women give birth at home with the help of family or a traditional birth attendant. But after hours and little progress, Intocelliah feared complications and danger for both her and her baby, and asked to go to the hospital.

  • Kate Consavage

    USAID | Nutrition Communications and Knowledge Management Advisor, Global Health Bureau
    New mothers are counseled on proper breastfeeding and nutrition practices by a peer mother during a women’s support group in the Rukiga district of southwest Uganda.

    New mothers are counseled on proper breastfeeding and nutrition practices by a peer mother during a women’s support group in the Rukiga district of southwest Uganda. Photo: Kate Consavage/USAID

    With one in three people affected by inadequate nutrition, the social, economic, and health consequences of malnutrition are tremendous. Adequate nutrition plays an important role in well-being at all life stages, but the 1,000-day window from a woman’s pregnancy through her child’s second birthday offers a unique opportunity to ensure a child’s proper growth and development for a more prosperous and healthy future. Both the causes and consequences of malnutrition are multi-faceted; therefore, tackling this vast burden requires multi-sectoral coordination and action. Guided by its Multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy, USAID’s nutrition efforts address both the direct and underlying causes of malnutrition, fostering healthier, more productive individuals and families and more stable and resilient societies.

  • Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    SMART Storytelling for Advocacy

    SMART Storytelling for Advocacy

    Stories and storytelling have the potential to change health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. When incorporated into advocacy strategies, stories can influence policy and funding decisions in powerful ways. This skills-building webinar shares essential tips for using SMART storytelling for advocacy.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    We’re doing all this good work: What are we learning and how do we share it?

    Over the course of a global health project, team members learn a lot about what successfully improves health and what doesn’t. Capturing and sharing this knowledge is essential to designing and implementing more effective programs in the future.

  • Linking Family Planning and Global Development

    Stephanie Desmon

    CCP | Director, Public Relations and Marketing
    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia.

    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Photo by Daniel Adero.

    This piece originally appeared on CCP's blog.

    The concept is simpler than the name suggests: To improve communities and the livelihoods of their people.

    The approach is called Population, Health and Environment, PHE for short. PHE programs are specifically designed to promote modern family planning, encourage environmental conservation and improve health outcomes by creating a package of interventions such as pairing education about dwindling fisheries with education around contraception and malaria prevention.

  • Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    Meeting the Knowledge Needs of My Team

    Meeting the Knowledge Needs of My Team: How Do I Get Started?

    You and your team have established a shared goal. Maybe you have agreed to increase the contraceptive prevalence rate in Bangladesh, eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in South Africa, or prevent malaria across sub-Saharan Africa through vector control strategies. To accomplish the goal, your team needs access to a wide variety of knowledge to outline the scope of the problem, understand what others are doing, determine what intervention to use, and plan for implementation.