• Integrating Family Planning and Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Services

    This piece was originally published by the Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP).

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child.

    A midwife in Madagascar discusses family planning with a woman in labor with her seventh child. (Photo courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/MCSP.)

    Morondava, Madagascar—At home and in active labor with her third child, 24-year-old Intocelliah was scared. Her previous births had progressed quickly and naturally, but—after a long day of discomfort—this labor seemed stalled.

    In the neighborhood of Sanfily, where she lives, most women give birth at home with the help of family or a traditional birth attendant. But after hours and little progress, Intocelliah feared complications and danger for both her and her baby, and asked to go to the hospital.

  • Kate Consavage

    USAID | Nutrition Communications and Knowledge Management Advisor, Global Health Bureau
    New mothers are counseled on proper breastfeeding and nutrition practices by a peer mother during a women’s support group in the Rukiga district of southwest Uganda.

    New mothers are counseled on proper breastfeeding and nutrition practices by a peer mother during a women’s support group in the Rukiga district of southwest Uganda. Photo: Kate Consavage/USAID

    With one in three people affected by inadequate nutrition, the social, economic, and health consequences of malnutrition are tremendous. Adequate nutrition plays an important role in well-being at all life stages, but the 1,000-day window from a woman’s pregnancy through her child’s second birthday offers a unique opportunity to ensure a child’s proper growth and development for a more prosperous and healthy future. Both the causes and consequences of malnutrition are multi-faceted; therefore, tackling this vast burden requires multi-sectoral coordination and action. Guided by its Multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy, USAID’s nutrition efforts address both the direct and underlying causes of malnutrition, fostering healthier, more productive individuals and families and more stable and resilient societies.

  • Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    SMART Storytelling for Advocacy

    SMART Storytelling for Advocacy

    Stories and storytelling have the potential to change health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. When incorporated into advocacy strategies, stories can influence policy and funding decisions in powerful ways. This skills-building webinar shares essential tips for using SMART storytelling for advocacy.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    We’re doing all this good work: What are we learning and how do we share it?

    Over the course of a global health project, team members learn a lot about what successfully improves health and what doesn’t. Capturing and sharing this knowledge is essential to designing and implementing more effective programs in the future.

  • Linking Family Planning and Global Development

    Stephanie Desmon

    CCP | Director, Public Relations and Marketing
    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia.

    CCP’s Sarah Harlan interviews Shek Kasim Kurke, a religious leader in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Photo by Daniel Adero.

    This piece originally appeared on CCP's blog.

    The concept is simpler than the name suggests: To improve communities and the livelihoods of their people.

    The approach is called Population, Health and Environment, PHE for short. PHE programs are specifically designed to promote modern family planning, encourage environmental conservation and improve health outcomes by creating a package of interventions such as pairing education about dwindling fisheries with education around contraception and malaria prevention.

  • Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    Meeting the Knowledge Needs of My Team

    Meeting the Knowledge Needs of My Team: How Do I Get Started?

    You and your team have established a shared goal. Maybe you have agreed to increase the contraceptive prevalence rate in Bangladesh, eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in South Africa, or prevent malaria across sub-Saharan Africa through vector control strategies. To accomplish the goal, your team needs access to a wide variety of knowledge to outline the scope of the problem, understand what others are doing, determine what intervention to use, and plan for implementation.

  • Knowledge Management for Global Health

    Jennifer Tumusiime

    EGPAF Uganda | Knowledge Management Advisor
    Tumusiime share fair blog photo

    The East Africa Regional Share Fair attracted participants from many sectors.

    In his book Post-Capitalist Society, prominent management thinker and writer Peter F. Drucker notes, “Knowledge has become the key economic resource and the dominant—and perhaps even the only—source of competitive advantage.”

    How to make this a reality for East Africa informed most of the discussions at the Regional Share Fair conducted in Uganda in June 2018. The objective of the Share Fair was to collaboratively learn how to apply knowledge management (KM) tools, techniques, and approaches in the health sector.

  • Elizabeth Futrell

    CCP | Content Development Lead
    The Art of Photography is the second in K4Health/IYAFP's storytelling webinar series.

    The Art of Photography is the second in K4Health/IYAFP's storytelling webinar series. Photo: UYAHF

    The Knowledge for Health (K4Health) team has conducted storytelling workshops around the world over the past few years, from South Africa to the Philippines. We’ve been particularly energized by the opportunities we’ve had to help strengthen the capacity of grassroots youth-led organizations to use storytelling to reach their audiences and communicate about their work and the issues that matter to them. To share some of our essential tips and tools with a broader audience, particularly with young sexual and reproductive health professionals working in all corners of the world, K4Health is currently partnering with the International Youth Alliance for Family Planning (IYAFP) to jointly offer a digital storytelling webinar series.

  • Sophie Weiner

    CCP | Communications Specialist
    PHE Voices: Stories and Lessons Learned from Four Diverse Settings

    Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) experts from The Philippines, Madagascar, Ethiopia, and the Lake Victoria Basin share stories from the field. Photo credit: Meagan Harrison, courtesy of Photoshare.

    The Population, Health, and Environment (PHE) approach addresses the relationship between human health and environmental health in order to improve primary health care services, conserving biodiversity and natural resources, and develop sustainable livelihoods. When development issues are addressed together, communities thrive.

  • Simone Parrish

    CCP | Global Repository Director
    HIFA discussion forum

    HIFA discussion forum: An IntraHealth International image shows a young woman speaking to a group of her peers.

    Beginning on Monday, July 30, 2018, Healthcare Information for All (HIFA) will hold a four-week facilitated discussion about the family planning and reproductive health (FP/RH) information and service needs and rights of children and youth.

    This is the third discussion on family planning delivered under the HIFA Project on Family Planning and Contraception. Building upon themes from a March 2018 forum, this lively exchange will focus on the specific needs of children (aged 0-17 years) and youth (aged 15-24 years). The discussion will also highlight many useful resources, including the 2018 update to Family Planning: A Global Handbook for Providers.