Latest Updates

  • Blog post
    Women in Cameroon receive membership cards for a mutual health organization intended to reduce out-of-pocket healthcare costs.

    Women in Cameroon receive membership cards for a mutual health organization intended to reduce out-of-pocket healthcare costs. © 2012 Okwen Patrick Mbah, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Markets are made up of human beings. They are not just emotionless spaces where products and services are bought and sold. This is especially true of the market for family planning products, which ideally provides “...women with a range of options, enabling them to choose for themselves how to best fulfill their individual reproductive intentions” (see Market Shaping for Family Planning, p4). And yet, when mired in theoretical discussions of total market approaches, market dynamics and supply chains, it is all too easy to forget these people within the market. But to ensure a healthy market where a woman can choose the contraceptive method that works best for her, we first must understand what she wants and needs (think human-centered design).

  • Blog post

    Total market approach (TMA): A lens for assessing actors and interventions in all three sectors (public, private non-profit, and private for-profit) of the health system. Programs and policies promote and enhance contributions from all sectors and are client-focused.

  • Blog post

    This post originally appeared on the BID Initiative's blog.

    Global Digital Health Forum opening session.

    Global Digital Health Forum opening session. Photo: PATH/Kelly Fallt.

    We had the pleasure of attending the Global Digital Health Forum (GDHF) last month where the BID Initiative and Digital Health Solutions teams, along with other PATH teams, presented on several panels. As we move ahead with new and existing projects, we left the meeting encouraged by the work and collaboration among public- and private-sector partners to improve health system challenges. The following are six of the top takeaways from the event:

  • Blog post

    The Global Digital Health Forum 2016 was a perfect fit for me. It was a space where I met many practitioners working in the global health environment, more so than in previous meetings. The Forum provided a supportive professional environment to discuss similar challenges and opportunities between people and organizations working in the area of technology for health.

  • Blog post
    A group of data collectors snap a quick picture as they work to find rural villages in Northern Nigeria.

    A group of data collectors snap a quick picture as they work to find rural villages in Northern Nigeria. © 2013 eHealth Africa, Courtesy of Photoshare

    A common theme throughout the 2016 Global Digital Health Forum (GDHF) was sustainability. From the opening panel, through almost every session and hallway conversation, to the closing plenary, sustainability was a major topic of discussion. And, it seemed that each conversation almost always led to the same conclusions:

    1. In the digital health community, we know very little about successful approaches to program sustainability.
    2. We do know that identifying such approaches will require disruptive thinking.
    3. Members of the digital health community are ready to take on the challenge.

  • Blog post

    Over the past decade, the digital health field has sought to enhance opportunities to improve the delivery of, and access to, health services and information. At the third annual Global Digital Health Forum in Washington, D.C., programmers, researchers, tech providers, and investors convened for two days to share the latest innovations that are igniting the digital health arena in low- to middle-income countries. Presenters expanded on technologies ranging from a mobile app that offers reproductive health information to female refugees to highly sophisticated data dashboards that provide real-time feedback to community health workers. The vastness and endless potential of the field was an underpinning theme that excited and motivated participants and offered a glimpse into future horizons.

  • Blog post

    It’s my pleasure to announce the 12th Annual Photoshare Photo Contest! Photoshare’s annual contest recognizes the best in global health and development photography and rewards the talents and generosity of amateur and professional photographers who share photos for charitable and educational use.

  • Blog post
    Products from the AFFORD Health Marketing Initiative, including Injectaplan, MoonBeads, and Protector, available for sale at the Nyeihanga Medical Clinic in Uganda.

    Products from the AFFORD Health Marketing Initiative, including Injectaplan, MoonBeads, and Protector, available for sale at the Nyeihanga Medical Clinic in Uganda. © 2007 Jennifer Orkis, Courtesy of Photoshare

    In its strategy document for 2014-2020, USAID’s Office of Population and Reproductive Health identified total market approach, or TMA, as a key focus area for their work. Advocates argue that a TMA can increase access, improve equity, and make health systems more sustainable. While we can all agree that these are laudable outcomes, many people have been left wondering just what a TMA is. The term itself is jargon and not very clear. For a long time, different people would mean different things when they used the term, adding to the confusion. In recent years, though, a general consensus has begun to emerge.

  • Blog post
    A community health worker counsels her client on family planning issues under a tree in rural Uganda.

    A community health worker counsels her client on family planning issues under a tree in rural Uganda. Credit: Morrisa Malkin, FHI 360

    Community-based family planning (CBFP) is a safe and effective way to increase access to vital family planning (FP) services for people across the world. The global shortage of health care workers leaves many women with an unmet need for FP. Employing CBFP approaches helps reach the women who are most vulnerable to unintended pregnancy by bringing sexual and reproductive health services to them. FP2020’s goals include reaching an additional 120 million women by the year 2020—a goal that is attainable in large part because of CBFP practices, with their high efficacy in reaching more women and delivering effective services, safely—particularly to women in rural and underserved communities.

  • Blog post
    With no dock in Usisya, Malawi, workers load lifesaving health commodities onto a small boat to transport them from the large boat to the mainland.

    With no dock in Usisya, Malawi, workers load lifesaving health commodities onto a small boat to transport them from the large boat to the mainland. © 2012 USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Imagine a health system in which low-income clients can access free contraceptive products and services, those with slightly more financial means can access partially subsidized products and services, and those with the most robust ability to pay can purchase products and services from the commercial sector. Countries implementing a total market approach to family planning strive to make this a reality by using all available public, nonprofit, and private commercial sector resources and infrastructure to improve sustainable access to family planning services for all clients.