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  • Blog post
    When given the option, plenty of men choose vasectomy for their family planning method.

    When given the option, plenty of men choose vasectomy for their family planning method. © Jessica Scranton/FHI 360

    Twelve years ago, I sat in a waiting room in a small clinic on the outskirts of Byumba, Rwanda, and listened as one man after another stood up and asked the nurse at the front of the room what methods of family planning they could use, as men. The nurse had just completed a presentation of different family planning methods, and these men were hungry for an option besides condoms, the only male method available at that facility. It was powerful and moving to witness men who wanted to directly engage in family planning, not just as supportive partners, but as users themselves.

  • Blog post
    In addition to being one of the most effective forms of contraception available, the LNG-IUS has important non-contraceptive benefits.

    In addition to being one of the most effective forms of contraception available, the LNG-IUS has important non-contraceptive benefits. Photo courtesy of FHI 360.

    Over the past several months, K4Health has been shining a spotlight on LARCs, which stands for long-acting reversible contraceptives. While LARCs offer multiple advantages—they are highly effective, long-acting and cost-effective, and fertility returns quickly after removal—the term is actually a bit misleading. The acronym implies that a multitude of family planning methods fit within that broad category. But the truth is that that only two general types of methods meet the LARC definition: contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices (IUDs).

  • Blog post

    This post originally appeared on the Zika Communication Network.

    USAID, K4Health, and the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) are pleased to launch the Zika Communication Network (ZCN) —a reliable one-stop shop for Zika prevention and preparedness materials. ZCN curates essential, evidence-based tools and resources to help health and development professionals minimize the spread of Zika and related negative pregnancy outcomes using four key strategies:

  • Blog post
    Ann Masese, one of ECSA’s KM Champions, presenting at the knowledge café on after action reviews.

    Ann Masese, one of ECSA’s KM Champions, presenting at the knowledge café on after action reviews. Read her handout and browse other resources from the Share Fair in the event document repository.

    As a Knowledge Management Advisor on the K4Health Project in East Africa, I have been seconded to the East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community Secretariat based in Arusha, Tanzania. My responsibility as a KM advisor is to help strengthen KM capacity at the ECSA-HC and the East African Community’s Secretariats.

  • Blog post
    A service provider removes inserted family planning option from a client after its expiration at centre Igboro health facility in Ilorin in Nigeria’s central state of Kwara. © 2012 Akintunde Akinleye/NURHI, Courtesy of Photoshare

    A service provider removes inserted family planning option from a client after its expiration at centre Igboro health facility in Ilorin in Nigeria’s central state of Kwara. © 2012 Akintunde Akinleye/NURHI, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Contraceptive implants are available to more women around the world than ever before, thanks in large part to the Implant Access Program (IAP), a collaboration among several donor agencies, governments, non-governmental agencies (NGOs), and the makers of the contraceptive implants Jadelle® (Bayer HealthCare AG) and Implanon®/Implanon NXT® (Merck/MSD) to lower the products’ unit price by 50% for the world’s poorest countries. Since the launch of the IAP in 2013, 25.2 million implants have been purchased under this price reduction. Corresponding increases in implant use reported in national surveys such as the Performance, Monitoring & Accountability 2020 (PMA2020) indicate that women are taking advantage of the new found accessibility of affordable implants. Prevalence of implant use among married women has increased by 39% and 44% in Ethiopia and Kenya, respectively, in the last two years, and implants are currently the most commonly used method in Burkina Faso.

  • Blog post
    Patrick Segawa leads a group of young activists in a flash mob during the Women Deliver conference.

    Patrick Segawa leads a group of young activists in a flash mob during the Women Deliver conference.

    PHAU Team Leader Patrick Segawa, an SRH Avenger and Women Deliver Young Leader, reflects on some of his favorite moments at the Women Deliver conference.

    Recently, more than 5,500 people met in Copenhagen, Denmark for Women Deliver’s 4th Global Conference. They gathered to share their experiences, challenges, and lessons and to advocate for improved access to health, education, participation, and investment for girls and women.

  • Blog post
    During a village gathering to discuss family planning, a woman in a village near Shashemene, Ethiopia, proudly shows off her arm where Norplant is implanted. © 2005 Virginia Lamprecht, Courtesy of Photoshare

    During a village gathering to discuss family planning, a woman in a village near Shashemene, Ethiopia, proudly shows off her arm where Norplant is implanted. © 2005 Virginia Lamprecht, Courtesy of Photoshare

    Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods appeal to many women because they are highly effective, discreet, and forgettable—once in place, no regular action is required on the part of the user. Because of their long duration of effectiveness, they can also be more cost-effective for individuals, family planning programs, and donors compared with short-acting methods such as oral contraceptive pills or condoms.

  • Blog post
    Carla Visser and Willow Gerber enjoy an evening in Arusha.

    Carla Visser and Willow Gerber enjoy an evening in Arusha.

    Visiting Tanzania is a privilege—and more so when it is to participate in an event focusing on one of my passions: knowledge management. The East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community Knowledge Management (KM) Share Fair took place April 13-14, 2016 in Arusha with the theme of “peer-to-peer sharing.” There I had the opportunity to connect with fellow knowledge management professionals from 14 countries and territories and learn about approaches and innovations from the region. With panel discussions, knowledge cafés, group activities and social events, the structure of the meeting truly complemented its theme.

  • Blog post
    PhotoVoice gives participants an opportunity to capture the conditions around them, reflect on these conditions or their experiences, and develop strategies to reach policymakers. Photo: APHRC/GrOW Team

    PhotoVoice gives participants an opportunity to capture the conditions around them, reflect on these conditions or their experiences, and develop strategies to reach policy makers. Photo: APHRC/GrOW Team

    I was invited to participate in the Knowledge Management for Health Share Fair held in Arusha, Tanzania between April 13th and 15th. The share fair was well attended, with representatives from 14 countries, allowing for engaging conversations about various knowledge management tools and techniques that may revolutionize the health sector and how information is shared.

  • Blog post

    This post originally appeared on the USAID Learning Lab blog, Lab Notes.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    Courtney Calvin explains USAID's Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) approach. Photo by Heather Finn.

    The K4Health Knowledge Management Share Fair in Arusha, Tanzania brought together over 80 knowledge managers in the public health sector from Sub-Saharan Africa to catalyze a knowledge-sharing community and raise awareness of the role of knowledge management (KM) in international development. More than a typical conference, the Share Fair was an opportunity for international development practitioners representing ministries of health, intergovernmental agencies, and USAID implementing partners to interact and learn how to incorporate KM into their processes together.