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  • Blog post
    Congolese refugee women in Rwamwanja, Uganda. © EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi, 2017

    Congolese refugee women in Rwamwanja, Uganda. © EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi, 2017

    Girls and women faced a horrendous situation in Rwamwanja Refugee Settlement in western Uganda. I had only two choices to react to their poignant situation: Weep with them and we all become miserable, or take up their case and work to see something done.

  • Blog post
    Desmond Nji Atanga answers students' questions on family planning methods.

    Desmond Nji Atanga answers students' questions on family planning methods.

    Education opens up a wealth of choices and informed decisions necessary to live a healthy life. We know that education and health enjoy positively correlated benefits. Education improves health, while health facilitates successful education. One way of ensuring adequate access to family planning services is through information—and education certainly provides opportunities for that.

  • Blog post
    A woman with her 11th child in Niger, the country with the highest total fertility rate in the world.

    A woman with her 11th child in Niger, the country with the highest total fertility rate in the world. © 2013 Alison Heller/Washington University in Saint Louis, Courtesy of Photoshare

    This piece was originally published on the Health Policy Plus blog, Viewpoints.

    Earlier this year I traveled to Niger to support the Ministry of Health in refining the country's Costed Implementation Plan (CIP) for family planning. While there, I worked with a dedicated group—ministry staff, implementing partners, representatives from the religious community, and youth advocates—to agree on priorities that could accelerate progress on Niger's ambitious goal to increase its modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR) from 13 percent (or 14.4% for married women) to 50 percent by 2020. We spent 3.5 days combing through the results of their mid-term review of Niger's CIP to set priorities and identify which population groups, in addition to women, we should focus on reaching: youth (what age range?), men (which men: community leaders? partners?), religious leaders? At the end of the workshop, we felt a sense of accomplishment in our priorities going forward, which included establishing how the government can extend services throughout the large Sahelian country using community health workers, mobile clinics, and strategies to improve data collection. Another important priority we agreed on was a focus on educating youth on the socioeconomic benefits of family planning.

  • Blog post
    A mother and daughter embrace at Camp Langano, Ethiopia. Photo by Sean Sheridan.

    A mother and daughter embrace at Camp Langano, Ethiopia. Photo by Sean Sheridan.

    This piece was originally published on the Huffington Post and on the Health Policy Plus blog, Viewpoints.

    Over the past decade, rates of infant, child, and maternal deaths have decreased significantly. The efforts to reach the underserved are really making a difference and have resulted in big improvements. But with more than 300,000 women dying from pregnancy-related causes each year, we still have a long way to go. While there are many ways to save lives, one of the simplest and most cost-effective is contraception.

  • Blog post
    Cover of the M&E Guide published in 2007

    M&E Guide (2007)

    K4Health and the Global Health Knowledge Collaborative share five ways organizations have measured knowledge management activities based on a monitoring and evaluation guide.

    Before we were known as K4Health, USAID’s flagship knowledge management project, led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, was the INFO Project. It was almost 10 years ago, in November 2007, that INFO Project staff published the Guide to Monitoring and Evaluating Health Information Products and Services. The Guide was developed in collaboration with HIPNet (the Health Information and Publications Network), and featured a rudimentary logic model and 29 indicators.

  • Blog post
    Climate-affected internally displaced persons board a boat to travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Climate-affected internally displaced persons board a boat to travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh. © 2014 M Ponir Hossain, Courtesy of Photoshare

    We live in a connected world. The rise in mobile device ownership, internet coverage, and wireless access means that we can reach each other from nearly anywhere, at any time. Yet technology is far from the only thing that connects us. There are a number of complex connections between our families, our health, and the environment that impact our lives. Recognizing these interactions, development practitioners have established a term to describe programming approaches that concurrently address issues related to families, their health, and the environment. This approach is called Population, Health and Environment (PHE).

  • Blog post
    Annah Sango

    "I need to allow myself to be led in order to lead effectively."

    Annah Sango is a Women Deliver Young Leader from Zimbabwe. She is a passionate advocate for youth health and well-being, encouraging her peers to learn about their sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially concerning HIV/AIDS. Here, she shares her reflections on what advocacy means to her.

    My advocacy experiences have been and still are a learning process. I have interacted with mentors and whole groups of people who have demonstrated amazing skills and work. Along the way, I have learnt that advocacy is a journey that happens on different levels. As a young woman, I should not merely occupy spaces without validating my relevance and representation of what I stand for. Sometimes making noise is not activism—and sometimes, making the necessary noise is.

  • Blog post
    Mayors from francophone West Africa learn more about TCI and family planning at a site visit in Senegal.

    Mayors from francophone West Africa learn more about TCI and family planning at a site visit in Senegal. Photo by Clement Tardif for IntraHealth International.

    “I can’t believe it’s so small!”

    I will never forget the reaction of one of the mayors in Rwanda during an advocacy workshop on family planning as we passed around a variety of modern contraceptive methods, inviting participants to open, touch, and feel them. It was his first experience holding an intrauterine device (IUD). He also had never touched a female condom or seen a contraceptive implant.

  • Blog post

    During the East Africa Community’s 6th Health and Scientific Conference in March, I was struck by parallels with a recent music show. During both events, the main actors paid homage to tradition while embracing innovation.

    The Tedeschi Trucks Band members I saw play together, like the conference organizers, were in sync throughout, let each player highlight their strengths, and kept their focus on the output.

  • Blog post
    eIDSR training group

    As eIDSR’s intended users are mostly new to smartphone use, eHA simplified the user interface and designed it to closely resemble familiar paper reporting forms. Photo: Les de Wit, Software Project Manager, eHealth Africa

    eHealth Africa (eHA) is collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), and other partners to support Sierra Leone’s Ministry of Health and Sanitation (MoHS) to strengthen surveillance for all priority diseases and improve preparedness for potential public health emergencies.